Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - August 17, 2017 


On our nationwide rundown; President Trump disbands two economic councils as CEO’s resign in protest; we will tell you why Iowa, like Trump, has bias issues; plus land trusts are a prime spot to view Monday’s solar eclipse.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WA: Urban Planning/Transportation

Electric cars are catching on in Washington, and motorists now have a scenic byway dotted with charging stations. (Wash. State House Republicans/Flickr)

WENATCHEE, Wash. – This summer, electric car owners will have the chance to explore the Evergreen State's "electric highway." Stretching from Everett to Spokane, U.S. Highway 2 is the first scenic byway in the country lined with charging stations for electric vehicles. At the beginning of Ju

Utility company Avista is working with Spokane-area universities to develop more efficient electric grids. (Washington State University)

SPOKANE, Wash. -- Two utility companies in Washington have been awarded $3.5 million each from the state's Clean Energy Fund for research into making city electric grids more efficient. Their projects are just the beginning of efforts to make cities smarter. Spokane-based Avista Utilities will use

Self-driving cars still are in their testing phase but one day could improve the lives of people with disabilities. (Don DeBold/Flickr)

OLYMPIA, Wash. -- Washington state lawmakers are in the beginning stages of developing regulations for self-driving cars, but they're already being asked to keep people with disabilities in mind. A research paper commissioned by the Ruderman Family Foundation and Securing America's Future Energy e

The Urban Freight Lab is exploring the ways cities can more efficiently deliver e-commerce. (Arvell Dorsey Jr./Flickr)

SEATTLE -- There's been a massive amount of consumer spending over the holidays this year, but it's likely that online shopping is the source of the uptick. Online sales on Black Friday were up 22 percent in 2016 over 2015 sales, topping a record $3.3 billion. What will all the trend toward more o

Washington state is looking to learn from other states how to develop community solar projects. (naturalflow/Flickr)

OLYMPIA, Wash. – Washington state's step toward a clean-energy future in the new year will involve more communities generating their own renewable energy. The Evergreen State is one of four chosen by the National Governors Association to swap policy advice on how to modernize its electric-powe

Researchers at a Washington state lab say the amount of sewage treated in the United States each year could yield 30 million barrels of oil. (Water Environment & Reuse Foundation)

RICHLAND, Wash. - Research at a Washington state lab is proving not everything flushed down the toilet is waste. Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have created an energy- and cost-effective method for turning sewage into biocrude oil. The process mirrors the geological conditions

Warmer winters in the Northwest due to climate change could mean more damage from species such as pine beetle. (Don Becker/U.S. Geological Survey)

SEATTLE – Many of the effects of climate change scientists did not expect to happen for decades into the future are happening now. According to a new study in the journal Science, researchers found that every ecosystem on Earth is being impacted by a warming globe, from the genetic level up.

Researchers and others believe breaching the four Lower Snake River dams could give Puget Sound orcas more fish to feed on. (Seabamirum/Flickr)

SPOKANE, Wash. – As the public weighs in today in Spokane on the future of the Lower Snake River dams, researchers are calling for their removal in order to save Puget Sound orcas. In October, two members of the J pod of Southern Resident killer whales died, and scientists at the Center for

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