Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - December 13, 2017 


Alabama elects Democrat Doug Jones to the U.S. Senate; also on our rundown; A court victory for tribes and environmental group fighting uranium mining in the Grand Canyon; and Seattle appears headed towards a police accountability initiative for 2018.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WA: Environmental Justice

The Millennium Bulk Terminal that was slated to be built in Longview would have shipped up to 44 million tons of coal a year to Asia. (Sam Beebe/Flickr)

LONGVIEW, Wash. - A proposal for what would be the largest coal-export terminal in North America might have sunk on Tuesday. A coalition of community, tribal and business leaders is hailing the Washington Department of Ecology's decision to deny a water-quality permit to developers of the Millenniu

Northwest tribes are fighting the proposed expansion of the TransMountian Pipeline, which would stretch from the Alberta tar sands to Puget Sound. (Stop Carbon Pollution/Flickr)

SEATTLE – The mother of all pipelines could be coming to the Northwest, and Native Americans in the region want their voices heard on the proposal. The Houston-based company, Kinder Morgan's expanded TransMountain Pipeline would stretch from the Alberta tar sands to Puget Sound and could tra

BNSF is on trial over transport of coal on its railways in Washington state. (Matthew Nichols/Flickr)

SEATTLE - Environmental groups say railway company BNSF is allowing coal to fall off uncovered coal trains and into Washington's waterways, and this week they're looking to prove it in front of a federal judge in Seattle. The Puget Soundkeeper, Natural Resource Defense Council and others say BNSF i

The EPA has until November to finalize new rules, known as fish consumption rules, for water quality standards in Washington. (pixabay)

SEATTLE - A U.S. federal judge has told the EPA it must finalize new water-quality rules aimed at making Washington state waters cleaner. The rules are known as fish consumption rules because they must ensure that fish caught in Washington state waters are safe to eat. Last year, the EPA said Washin

In 2011, the EPA released its first-ever findings of environmental discrimination in a case of pesticide spray near a California school. (Chafer Machinery/Flickr)

SEATTLE - The Environmental Protection Agency rarely investigates complaints from minority communities that allege local environmental regulations are discriminatory. According to the Center for Public Integrity, only one of seven cases in Washington state has been accepted for investigation sinc

Rail accidents could increase by 22 percent if improvements are not made to rail lines, according to a report on the proposed Columbia River coal terminal. (Greg Goebel/Yvcol_2b)

SEATTLE - Greenhouse-gas emissions from the proposed Millennium Bulk Terminals coal-export project in Longview would be equivalent to adding more than 600,000 cars to the road each year. That's according to a draft environmental impact study released by Cowlitz County and the Washington State Depa

The Washington State Department of Agriculture investigated 123 potential violations of the state's pesticide laws. (Charles O'Rear/United States Department of Agriculture)

SEATTLE - The Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA), investigated 18 percent more potential violations of the state's pesticides laws in the fiscal year of 2015. In a few major cases, people were exposed to pesticide drift. That's according to an annual pesticide report to the legislatur

A big crowd turned out Jan. 5 for the hearing on the Tesoro-Savage oil-shipping terminal. (Maddie Foutch)

SEATTLE - The year is only a week old, and it's already a big one for opponents of the oil-shipping terminals proposed in the state. They're counting as a "win" the news that the Renewable Energy Group says its future plans won't include handling crude oil at the terminal it purchased in Grays Harb

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