Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - November 21, 2017 


The Trump administration shows 50 thousand Haitians the door; also on the rundown; graduate students say the GOP Tax Bill is a primary concern; net neutrality in the balance today; plus a look at whether music can be a deterrent to juvenile crime.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WA: Consumer Issues

Graduate students who work at the University of Washington could see their taxes go up by $5,000, according to a student employees' union. (Intel Free Press/Flickr)

SEATTLE – Cash-strapped graduate students in Washington state and across the country are watching the tax debate in Congress closely. A provision in the House GOP's bill to overhaul the tax code, which passed last week, would turn tuition waivers offered by universities into taxable income.

Nearly 500,000 people die from smoking each year in the United States. (PublicDomainPictures/Pixabay)

SEATTLE – Thursday is the Great American Smokeout, an event challenging people to make plans to quit smoking. There are more than 36 million smokers nationwide, and health experts are reminding people that tobacco use is the single largest preventable cause of disease and death in the world.

About 3.6 million Washingtonians have their money in a local credit union. (TBIT/Pixabay)

SHELTON, Wash. – Credit unions in Washington state and around the world are celebrating International Credit Union Day Thursday. These banking alternatives are growing in popularity in the Evergreen State, with half of Washington residents now members of one of 90 local credit unions. Many

After-school and summer programs are helping Washington children develop both career and coping skills, according to a report to the State Legislature. (Sparkwind Movement)

SEATTLE – Washington state is improving programs for children after school and in the summer, according to a report to the Legislature, which agreed to help fund the programs. When programs are properly funded and work right, they can improve children's academic, social and emotional abiliti

Antitrust laws may not be effective at busting up modern day technology companies. (David Ryder/Getty Images)

SEATTLE – Nowhere is the trend toward market consolidation, or monopolization, more apparent than in the technology industry. In August, Seattle-based Amazon acquired Whole Foods Market, raising questions about whether the company is becoming a monopoly. Washington state also is home to an

Seattle is the fastest growing big city in the country, but some worry its growth is leaving some communities behind. (Andrew E. Larsen/Flickr)

SEATTLE – Like many cities across the country, Seattle is finding great wealth often brings great wealth disparity. The Emerald City has the fifth highest median income among large U.S. cities, is home to two tech giants in Amazon and Microsoft and is the nation's fastest growing big city.

College students should be weary of the bombardment of credit card offers they will get. (PixelMakerEric/Pixabay)

SEATTLE -- It's an exciting time of year for students heading off to college for the first time, but with that independence comes new responsibilities. One of the most important is financial responsibilities. Every student - whether they are living off student loans, a part-time job, or checks fro

People are paying more than $1.3 trillion in student loan debt in the United States. (Michael Fleshman/Flickr)

SEATTLE - The college year has started again, and for many students that means anxiety over debt is here again, too. According to the Institute for College Access and Success, the class of 2015 in Washington state graduated with an average debt of $24,600. The College for All Act now in Congress ai

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