Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - February 21, 2018 


While school shooting survivors demand stricter gun control measures some teachers are talking about their own walkout; Republicans vow to keep fighting the new district map in Pennsylvania; and from the West Coast - a health care group slams Trump's "Skinny" insurance plans.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WA: Criminal Justice

Recidivism rates are higher for people who aren't able to find a job after they're released from prison. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

OLYMPIA, Wash. – A bill that would help formerly incarcerated Washingtonians get a fairer chance at employment is scheduled for a public hearing Wednesday. The Fair Chance Act would "ban the box" – that is, prevent employers from asking about a person's criminal background until after

The campaign for Initiative 940 has gathered more than 300,000 signatures. (De-Escalate Washington)

SEATTLE – Andre Taylor moved back to his hometown the day after he heard his younger brother, Che Taylor, a 46-year-old African-American man, had been shot and killed by two white Seattle police officers. Since that day in February 2016, Andre Taylor has been on a mission, becoming a leader

The Unlocking Futures program chose the Prison Scholar Fund and seven other businesses to receive support to expand their reach. (Dirk Van Velzen/Prison Scholar Fund)

SEATTLE – What would it take to reform criminal justice and reduce the number of people who return to prison? A nonprofit group in Washington state might have the answer. The Prison Scholar Fund helps people behind bars finance their college education. So far, the program has been very suc

The Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals serves the western part of the country, including Washington state, and has several judgeship vacancies. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

SEATTLE -- President Donald Trump is fulfilling his promise to reshape the judicial branch. But some of his nominations have legal experts concerned he could be putting the integrity of the courts at risk. One of Trump's latest nominees for a federal court judgeship, Brett Talley, has never tried

The U.S. Supreme Court heard a case Monday that could affect whether nearly 25 million workers have the right to file class-action lawsuits against their employers. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

SEATTLE – Workers in Washington state and across the country watched the U.S. Supreme Court closely Monday as justices heard oral arguments in a case to determine whether employers can ban class-action lawsuits. The case, Epic Systems Corporation versus Lewis, involves arbitration agreements

People with criminal records often struggle to find employment once they are out of prison. A new website aims to help. (TeroVesalaienen/Pixabay)

SEATTLE – It can be hard to find a job, but imagine doing it with a criminal record. An estimated 70 million people have records – including more than 1.5 million Washingtonians – and they often struggle to find companies willing to hire them. That's why Richard Bronson started

An app in development at the University of Washington could be an inexpensive way to more accurately diagnose concussions in youth sports. (C Watts/Flickr)

SEATTLE – Football season is here again and, while the National Football League and college football sometimes are seen as punting on the issue, concussions are a big deal. But it isn't always easy to know when an athlete has a concussion. Researchers at the University of Washington have d

There have been five hunger strikes at Tacoma's Northwest Detention Center this year. (Seattle Globalist/Flickr)

TACOMA, Wash. - Fourteen Cubans seeking asylum and detained at the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma are on a hunger strike and calling for their release. They have refused food and water since Sunday. Maru Mora Villalpando, an organizer for the group Northwest Detention Center Resistance, said

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