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PNS Daily Newscast - October 18, 2017 


Featured on our nationwide rundown; President Trump’s reported comments to a grieving military widow raising some eyebrows; we’ve got a breakdown on the impact of “Trumpcare” in states like Colorado; and a look back 50 years at Dow Chemical protests that turned violent in Wisconsin.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WI: Juvenile Justice

A UW-Madison legal expert says those seeking to renew their DACA permits should also seek other forms of immigration relief. (house.gov)

MADISON, Wis. – About 7,600 young immigrants living in Wisconsin are DACA participants, who were children when they arrived in the U.S. The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals permits that allow many of these so-called Dreamers to remain here are set to expire soon. There's an Oct. 5 de

Wisconsin is one of the few states that allow children to be kept in solitary confinement for long stretches of time. (3dmentat/iStockPhoto.com)

MADISON, Wis. – Wisconsin is one of few states that still allows children in state juvenile-corrections facilities to be put into solitary confinement, and a federal lawsuit challenges that practice as cruel and unusual punishment. A similar suit brought in Illinois a few years ago resulted in

A Wisconsin criminal-defense attorney says the state's approach to juvenile justice needs change. (lilly3/iStockPhoto)

SHEBOYGAN, Wis. - The Netflix documentary series "Making a Murderer" drew national attention to the 2005 murder of Teresa Halbach. Steven Avery was convicted of the murder, and Avery's nephew, Brendan Dassey, who was 16 at the time, was tried and convicted in adult court of helping Avery commit the

Prisons, such as the Racine Correctional Institute, have been a growth industry in Wisconsin, which now spends more tax dollars on correction than on education. Credit: Wisconsin Dept. of Corrections

MADISON, Wis. - A new analysis from the Wisconsin Budget Project suggests the state is spending too much on corrections, which is a drag on the economy and causes harm to the state's communities by splitting up families. Tamarine Cornelius, a budget analyst for the group, says Wisconsin's annual c

There is bipartisan support for legislation in Wisconsin to return to treating 17-year-old non-violent, first-time offenders in Juvenile Court. Credit: Arva Csaba/iStockphoto

MADISON, Wis. - Seventeen-year-olds in Wisconsin may be getting second chances. In early December, there will be another hearing in the state Senate regarding legislation to reverse the 1996 law that says 17-year-old offenders must be charged in adult court. The proposed changes would allow 17-yea

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