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PNS Daily Newscast - April 25, 2018 


President Trump loses another round in court on immigrant “dreamers.” Also on today’s rundown: Environmentalists tell New York Governor Cuomo to match words with action; California lawmakers wear jeans to take a stand against sexual violence; and Airbnb called out for “secret deals.”

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WV: Education

West Virginia counties with a lot of Marcellus drilling have come to depend on property taxes from the wells. (Pixabay)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. — A pair of cases before the West Virginia Supreme Court over gas well property taxes could be "devastating" to local governments and schools. Antero Resources won its cases in Doddridge County Circuit Court, but the implications could extend statewide or industry-wide. Th

West Virginia spends about 20 percent less on school workers as a proportion of the state's Gross Domestic Product than it did eight years ago. (W. Va. Center on Budget and Policy)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — Striking teachers are angry about rising health care premiums and eroding benefits from West Virginia's Public Employee Insurance Agency. But what would a real PEIA fix look like? School workers, who are away from their classrooms for an eighth day today, say they want mo

According to the West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy, a proposed business tax cut would have cost the same as an 11-percent raise for teachers and school service workers. (Sean O'Leary/WV COBP)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – West Virginia Senate President Mitch Carmichael, R-Jackson County, says the state can only afford a 4-percent pay raise for teachers. But is that true? Critics point out that Carmichael started the legislative session backing a plan to cut taxes on business machinery, eq

Thousands of teachers and school employees faced a cold rain to rally for better pay and insurance outside the West Virginia Capitol on Saturday. (Dan Heyman)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — West Virginia teachers say they'll strike Thursday and Friday over pay and health insurance, and bills likely to pass the legislature look unlikely to prevent a longer walkout. The House and Senate have debated raising teacher pay by 1 percent a year. But according to the

The Annie E. Casey Foundation has just issued an important study of children's well-being in West Virginia and around the country. (Pixabay)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. - A high proportion of West Virginia children are living in stubbornly persistent poverty, according to a major new study. The Annie E. Casey Foundation's "Race for Results" report looked at a variety of health, education, family stability and income data by state. In West Virgin

Medicaid supports much of the health-care provided in West Virginia schools. (Mary Kuhlman)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – Health care providers say a Republican bill that includes Medicaid cuts would threaten West Virginia's school health services. Medicaid pays much of the cost for school nurses and therapists here, and for more than 50 school-based community clinics, many in rural areas.

The end of the regular legislative session has set the stage for a fight over West Virginia's state budget  a battle organizers say might be settled by public opinion. (W. Va. Legislature)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. -- At the last moment, the State Legislature passed a budget with deep cuts to to Medicaid and to K-12 and higher education. Now community groups are saying the voices of West Virginians are going to be vital to resolving the state's budget standoff. The Republican leadership of

Budget watchers say priorities such as road repairs could go underfunded if the state closes its budget gap entirely or mostly through cuts. (Protect WV)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – The West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy is warning against trying to close the state's $600 million budget gap entirely or mostly through cuts. Governor Jim Justice wants to raise $450 million in new revenue - with about half of that coming from increased business tax

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