Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - March 30, 2017 


Featured on today’s rundown; LGBTQ Americans excluded from the 2020 Census; we take a look at how Trump’s energy policies could hurt the sector’s biggest jobs creator; plus how overturning online privacy rules may especially impact immigrants.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WV: Climate Change/Air Quality

According to the Clean Air Task Force, carbon capture can work well to dramatically reduce CO2 from natural-gas power plants. (CATF)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – Bills in Congress to subsidize carbon capture and storage might have an unexpected impact at natural gas power plants. In a shift from a hard line, some fossil fuel corporations and their Washington allies are now backing tax credits for carbon capture. John Thompson, d

The falling cost of solar and wind is changing the energy picture in the developing world. (World Resource Institute)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – Renewable energy is growing fast in poor countries, and in a change from a few years ago, demand for coal is stalled or falling. According to the international bodies that track the patterns, more solar and wind power is coming online than any other kind of energy. Vri

A new poll finds strong support among conservatives for policies supporting renewables and clean energy. (Public Opinion Strategies)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. - President-elect Donald Trump's position on renewables and clean energy is worrying environmentalists - but according to a new national poll, his voters strongly favor them. The post-election survey found that nearly 90 percent of all voters support more government action to spe

One important decision awaiting President-elect Donald Trump is what to do with rules intended to reduce carbon pollution and slow climate change. (Sierra Club)

CHARLESTOWN, W.Va. – What will the Trump Administration do with Obama air-pollution limits designed to slow climate change? The U.S. Supreme Court ruled the federal government has to cut greenhouse gasses, including CO2 from existing power plants, but the feds' Clean Power Plan has been stalle

West Virginians will be some of those protesting in favor of the Clean Power Plan outside a courthouse in Washington, D.C., when states including West Virginia sue to stop the plan. (Chesapeake Climate Action Network)

CHARLESTON, W.V. -- West Virginia is one of the states suing the federal government to stop Environmental Protection Agency carbon limits. Arguments will begin this week in Washington, D.C., but some West Virginia residents plan to protest in favor of the Clean Power Plan in front of the courthouse.

A new poll shows young Republican voters strongly favor shifting to renewable energy. (Evan Hansen)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – Young conservatives overwhelmingly feel manmade climate change is a real problem, according to a just-released poll. These GOP voters strongly favor renewable energy. The national survey of a thousand Republicans ages 18 to 35 was commissioned by Young Conservatives for E

Highland Appalachian spruce can help reduce the amount of carbon in the air. (Forest Wander/Wikipedia)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Restoring highland Appalachian spruce forests could help reduce the amount of carbon in the atmosphere. All healthy forests take CO2 out of the air and trap carbon in the trees and the ground. But, according to soil scientist Stephanie Connolly who works in the Monongahela Nation

An environmental group will be in West Virginia this week with a thermal imaging camera to document normally invisible pollution. (Earthworks/Youtube)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – Armed with a specialized thermal imaging camera, a group is traveling in the West Virginia Marcellus fields this week documenting natural gas leaks and pollution. Nadia Steinzor, eastern program coordinator for Earthworks, says the environmental group bought a forward loo

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