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PNS Daily Newscast - July 21, 2017 


On our rundown today: the Russia probe expands to include an investigation into President Trump’s business transactions; the DREAM Act is back in Congress; and a scientific organization says the president’s nominee for a top science role at the USDA is unqualified.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WV: Mental Health

Some recovering opioid users in West Virginia say the treatment they get through Medicaid is all that's keeping them from an addiction that could kill them. (3/Wikipedia)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. -- One of the big issues in the current healthcare debate is what will happen to Medicaid support for substance abuse treatment. Some in West Virginia say they're afraid losing it could kill them. Bailey Hendricks is a single mother from St. Albans, and a recovering opioid addict.

Medicaid supports much of the health-care provided in West Virginia schools. (Mary Kuhlman)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – Health care providers say a Republican bill that includes Medicaid cuts would threaten West Virginia's school health services. Medicaid pays much of the cost for school nurses and therapists here, and for more than 50 school-based community clinics, many in rural areas.

Retired Army Lt. Col. Teresa James says it's important for counselors to understand why victims of sexual assault in the military, like her, often don't speak up. (Teresa James)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. -- A retired army lieutenant colonel is telling her story of surviving sexual assault, and explaining to social workers what it's like to have her commanders retaliate against her for speaking out. Teresa James was nearing the end of her career with the West Virginia National Gua

Social worker Jennifer Wells says West Virginia was a caring refuge, just when she needed one. (J. Wells)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. -- Social worker Jennifer Wells says West Virginia chose her after Hurricane Katrina drove her out of her old home. And now her profession inspires her to make her new home a better place. Wells is one of four young women delivering the keynote at the National Association of Soci

West Virginia is one of only a few states with rising levels of young people behind bars, and advocates say part of the issue is a lack of behavioral health care. (WV Virginia Center on Budget and Policy)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – Lack of behavioral health care for children may be undermining West Virginia's efforts to reduce truancy, cut juvenile incarceration and improve foster care, advocates say. They pointed to surveys showing that a much higher than average portion of state high school stude

Jim Justice, the Democratic Party candidate for West Virginia governor, says the state has no choice but to find the money to pay for more drug treatment. (Dan Heyman)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – Billionaire and gubernatorial candidate Jim Justice is forcefully calling for more drug treatment. But he's vague on how West Virginia could pay for more treatment centers. West Virginia is battling a big budget deficit while, as Justice puts it, opioid addiction has the

West Virginia author Laurie Helgoe wants people to appreciate the power in being an introvert. (L. Helgoe)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. - A West Virginia author says more people need to see the power in being an introvert. Davis and Elkins College psychology professor Laurie Helgoe says we live in a culture that rewards people for being outgoing – but the minds of introverts and extroverts just work differ

Marshall University counseling professor Carol Smith says new research about how trauma can change the brain shows a lot of practical promise. (Dan Heyman)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. - A new understanding of how trauma changes the brain shows promise of helping with crime, education, health care, even parenting. Marshall University professor of counseling Carol Smith says traumatic injuries can be emotional or physical. She says the bad news is they can cha

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