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PNS Daily News - March 29, 2017 


Here’s a look at what’s making news today: Trump follows through on promises to dismantle climate policies; the head of the White House-Russia investigation says he won’t step down; and coast-to-coast opposition grows to Session’s sanctuary cities stance.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WV: Public Lands/Wilderness

Critics of the Atlantic Coast Pipeline say its path is dangerously prone to landslides. (Malcolm Cameron/the Dominion Pipeline Monitoring Coalition)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. -- Federal regulators are taking a favorable view of the huge Atlantic Coast Pipeline. But research by a citizen group has found that they are largely ignoring the risk of landslides. Three quarters of the pipeline's West Virginia path and nearly 30 percent of its path in Virgini

A draft environmental impact statement on the Mountain Valley Pipeline is drawing fire as incomplete. (Marcellus.org)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – Some government agencies and citizens groups are criticizing a draft study by federal regulators of a huge gas pipeline that would cross West Virginia and Virginia. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) has issued a Draft Environmental Impact Statement saying i

Critics say the agency that regulates natural-gas pipelines has a favorable bias toward the industry. (MarcellusPipeline.org)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – A spate of proposed gas pipeline projects has drawn sharp criticism from environmental advocates, who say the federal permitting agency has a built-in bias toward the industry. Last week, nearly 70 people from almost a dozen states testified at what organizers called a P

Tourists bike on the Williams River Road after flood damage repairs. Supporters of a new Birthplace of Rivers National Monument say it should help the area recover from this summer's storms. (Matt Kearns)

RICHWOOD, W. Va. – A new Birthplace of Rivers National Monument could help Richwood recover from this summer's devastating floods, according to local officials. Richwood Mayor Bob Henry Baber said it's difficult for the city council and the local chamber of commerce to focus on much beyond i

Despite public protests, several huge gas pipelines are moving through the regulatory process. Critics say that's bad news for consumers. (Chesapeake Climate Action Network/Flickr)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Huge gas pipelines now seeking approval aren't needed but will make utility rates spike, according to their critics. Federal regulators have issued a preliminary Environmental Impact Statement for the Mountain Valley Pipeline, a $3.2 billion project that would run 300 miles acro

What should West Virginia do to prepare for when the price of natural gas starts to increase and sparks more drilling? (Sierra Club)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – If the natural gas market follows classic patterns, drilling in the Marcellus shale will rise once the price climbs from the basement. What should West Virginia do to prepare? Sean O'Leary, a senior policy analyst with the West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy, says

Highland Appalachian spruce can help reduce the amount of carbon in the air. (Forest Wander/Wikipedia)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Restoring highland Appalachian spruce forests could help reduce the amount of carbon in the atmosphere. All healthy forests take CO2 out of the air and trap carbon in the trees and the ground. But, according to soil scientist Stephanie Connolly who works in the Monongahela Nation

Adam Swisher and Matt Kearns traveled the length of the Elk River. They say protecting it will be good for West Virginia's future. (Chad Cordell)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – As West Virginians consider their future, some say the Elk River runs right through it. In part to build support for the Birthplace of Rivers National Monument, Adam Swisher and Matt Kearns hiked, biked and paddled the entire Elk River in what they called the Elkspedition

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