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PNS Daily Newscast - October 19, 2017 


Attorney General Sessions tight-lipped before the Senate Judiciary Committee; a new report says birth control access is critical for both health and economic security; and expect a personal touch to finances as today marks Credit Union Day.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WV: Smoking Prevention

African-American children under age 5 in West Virginia are twice as likely to live in poverty as their white peers, according to a new report.(WV KIDS COUNT)

CHARLESTON, W.V. — African-American children in West Virginia aren't faring well compared to their white peers, according to a new report from West Virginia Kids Count. But, the report’s authors said, many of the problems they found can be solved. The group's research confirmed dispari

Faced with a government shutdown, many in the GOP-controlled West Virginia House of Delegates, including Speaker Tim Armstead, reluctantly voted to raise tobacco taxes. (Perry Bennett/W. Va. Legislature)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. - The House of Delegates has approved raising the state tobacco tax, removing the big obstacle to resolving West Virginia's budget standoff. The House voted to raise cigarette taxes by 65 cents a pack, then passed a budget that relies on the $100 million in new revenue. During

Amy Tolliver with the West Virginia Perinatal Partnership says a sharp hike in cigarette taxes would be a win-win. (Dan Heyman)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - West Virginia pregnancy-care providers want lawmakers to "pass the buck" by raising the state cigarette tax by $1 a pack. With a big hole in the state budget, the $150 million more a year in tobacco revenue looks appealing. But doctors here also hope to reduce the rate of smokin

Kick Butts Day stunts and events in West Virginia and around the country were aimed at stopping young people from smoking. (The Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – Wednesday was Kick Butts Day in West Virginia and around the country. The national anti-tobacco campaign aims to stop teen smoking with a little creative marketing. Rachel Skubis, a teacher at Robert C. Byrd High School in Clarksburg, said her students made selfie signs

Anti-smoking groups say evidence shows tobacco tax increases don't chase sales out of state.(WalletHub)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. - In spite of industry arguments, anti-smoking groups say the evidence shows a sharp boost in the state's tobacco tax won't drive sales out of the state. West Virginia's cigarette tax is more than $1 a pack under the national average. Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin wants to raise that 45 c

West Virginia has one of the lowest tobacco taxes in the country and the highest smoking rate - twice the national average by number of packs sold. (Coalition for a Tobacco Free West Virginia)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin's proposed tobacco tax increase is so small that it may be worse than none at all, say anti-smoking advocates. Tomblin wants to raise cigarette taxes by 45 cents a pack and tax e-cigarettes for the first time. That isn't enough to stop adults from smoking o

The number of cigarette packs sold per person has fallen around the county, but remain high in West Virginia. (Coalition for Tobacco Free West Virginia)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - The state has cut funds for West Virginia anti-smoking programs by nearly one-fifth - even as West Virginia has become, by some measures, the state with the highest rate of tobacco use. About one in four adults and one in five state high schoolers use tobacco. But Chuck Hamsher,

Medicaid is fifty years old, and research shows its positive effects on West Virginia children. Photo courtesy National Institutes of Health.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – Medicaid is 50 years old this week, and the impact it's had on the lives of children is being praised, both by advocates and academics. Renate Pore, director of health care policy for West Virginians for Affordable Healthcare, says 60 percent of the pregnancy care and birt

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