Newscasts

PNS Weekend Newscast - March 25th, 2017 


Here's a look at the news we're covering:  A big blow to the GOP and President Trump when the plan to replace Obama Care fails,  A couple of new reports out on the state of water in the U.S show work needs to be done and budget cuts in one state are threatening those who are most vulnerable. 

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WV: Welfare Reform

Critics say a bill before the West Virginia Legislature to require drug testing of some welfare recipients won't produce the results supporters say it will. (Dan Heyman)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Critics say requiring West Virginia welfare recipients to pass drug tests won't produce the results supporters say they will - but a bill to do just that is before the Legislature. Senate Bill 6 could require drug testing for some new Temporary Assistance to Needy Families clien

West Virginia food banks say tightening access to state safety-net programs will add pressure on feeding programs. (Letsmove.gov/USDA)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. - Lawmakers may tighten access to West Virginia safety-net programs but food banks in the state say that would only raise the pressure on already-stretched feeding programs. Legislation would expand work requirements for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program or SNAP, for

Critics say, unlike much of the country, West Virginia's unemployment rate is still too high to restrict access to SNAP benefits. (WV Center on Budget and Policy)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. - Some state lawmakers want to make it harder for single adults to collect SNAP benefits. Critics say that would cost West Virginia's economy tens of millions of dollars a year. A plan at the legislature would make it more difficult for adults without dependents or disabilities t

PHOTO: W.Va. Healthy Kids And Families Coalition logo.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - By now, a lot of people are probably sick of politics. But a new, nonpartisan drive aims to put democracy into action for West Virginia children living in poverty. According to census data, almost half of the state's kids live in homes at or near the poverty level, most with pare

Syble Solomon. Photo courtesy of Solomon.

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – New research is helping families break the cycle of constant financial crisis, and it doesn't cost much to do it. According to financial educator Syble Solomon, the key findings confirm that people make mistakes when under stress. She says this helps explain why people mak

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Starting next week, the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources will begin phasing in cuts to state-supported child care. Some parents say that could force them to drop out of school or become unemployed. Teresa Conley, Wayne, has a five-year-old boy and is a ful

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - A two-month extension in federal support for extended unemployment insurance is about to expire. Religious and community groups want Congress to continue the benefits without putting new requirements on the jobless. However, leaders in the House of Representatives want continued

CHARLESTON, W. Va. - This week marks the one-year anniversary of the Affordable Care Act, and national polls say about one in eight Americans feel reform has already helped them personally. According to a new study by the advocacy group Families USA, about 400,000 West Virginians are now seeing ben

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