Newscasts

PNS Daily News - April 26, 2017 


Among the stories we are featuring today: National monuments at risk under an expected executive order; the latest on negotiations to avoid a government shutdown; and attempts to overturn Citizens United ramp up.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WV: Environmental Justice

The falling cost of solar and wind is changing the energy picture in the developing world. (World Resource Institute)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – Renewable energy is growing fast in poor countries, and in a change from a few years ago, demand for coal is stalled or falling. According to the international bodies that track the patterns, more solar and wind power is coming online than any other kind of energy. Vri

Critics say the agency that regulates natural-gas pipelines has a favorable bias toward the industry. (MarcellusPipeline.org)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – A spate of proposed gas pipeline projects has drawn sharp criticism from environmental advocates, who say the federal permitting agency has a built-in bias toward the industry. Last week, nearly 70 people from almost a dozen states testified at what organizers called a P

One important decision awaiting President-elect Donald Trump is what to do with rules intended to reduce carbon pollution and slow climate change. (Sierra Club)

CHARLESTOWN, W.Va. – What will the Trump Administration do with Obama air-pollution limits designed to slow climate change? The U.S. Supreme Court ruled the federal government has to cut greenhouse gasses, including CO2 from existing power plants, but the feds' Clean Power Plan has been stalle

Utilities in southern coastal states are cleaning up the coal ash left from decades of power generation. (Sierra Club)

CHARLESTON, W.V. — As Congress debates the issue, utilities and communities in southeastern states are moving ahead with clean up of millions of tons of coal ash in impoundments at power plants. Until recently, Congress had been deadlocked regarding this legacy of a coal-powered century. In

Documents show nearly 50 containers of low-level radioactive West Virginia fracking waste was dumped into a Kentucky landfill, amid regulatory confusion and questionable business practices. (WV DHHR)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Behind the low-level radioactive waste dumped in a Kentucky landfill are regulatory loopholes and questionable business practices, according to state and local documents. Tom FitzGerald, director of the Kentucky Resources Council, obtained correspondence between Kentucky and Wes

The disposal of low-level radioactive waste derived from Marcellus and Utica shale in Kentucky landfills is raising red flags. (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

CHARLESTON W.Va. - The paper trail of a company that dumped West Virginia radioactive frack waste into Kentucky landfills is raising serious questions. This spring, regulators cited Advanced TENORM Services for dumping the low-level radioactive waste in two municipal landfills. Not long after, the c

An environmental group will be in West Virginia this week with a thermal imaging camera to document normally invisible pollution. (Earthworks/Youtube)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – Armed with a specialized thermal imaging camera, a group is traveling in the West Virginia Marcellus fields this week documenting natural gas leaks and pollution. Nadia Steinzor, eastern program coordinator for Earthworks, says the environmental group bought a forward loo

West Virginians say news of lead contamination in the drinking water of Flint, Mich., is painfully familiar. (Friends of Water)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. - Nearly 40 West Virginia groups are sending an open letter to the people of Flint, Michigan saying they know what it's like to have contaminated drinking water. When the news leaked that Flint's water has high levels of lead, many folks in Charleston immediately thought of the

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