Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - April 25, 2018 


President Trump loses another round in court on immigrant “dreamers.” Also on today’s rundown: Environmentalists tell New York Gov. Cuomo to match words with action; California lawmakers wear jeans, taking a stand against sexual violence; and Airbnb is called out for “secret tax deals.”

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WV: Environmental Justice

Black Lung is an incurable disease caused by breathing coal dust, which gets worse until a miner dies. (Yale Rosen/Fickr)

MATEWAN, W.Va. — A group of miners has put forward a plan for a state black lung program. It would solve problems in the federal system they say now stop miners from getting benefits. Eighty percent of the funds in the federal black lung program go to doctors, lawyers, judges and bureaucrats

Justice First organizer Rev. Leo Woodberry says their effort is timed to lead up to the People's Climate March 2018, and ahead of this fall's elections. (Vimeo/The People's Climate March)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — A tour of 10 southern states focusing on clean energy and justice issues kicks off today in Raleigh, N.C. The Justice First campaign will visit more than 20 cities by mid-August, highlighting environmental, economic, racial and gender justice, among other issues. The Rev.

The falling cost of solar and wind is changing the energy picture in the developing world. (World Resource Institute)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – Renewable energy is growing fast in poor countries, and in a change from a few years ago, demand for coal is stalled or falling. According to the international bodies that track the patterns, more solar and wind power is coming online than any other kind of energy. Vri

Critics say the agency that regulates natural-gas pipelines has a favorable bias toward the industry. (MarcellusPipeline.org)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – A spate of proposed gas pipeline projects has drawn sharp criticism from environmental advocates, who say the federal permitting agency has a built-in bias toward the industry. Last week, nearly 70 people from almost a dozen states testified at what organizers called a P

One important decision awaiting President-elect Donald Trump is what to do with rules intended to reduce carbon pollution and slow climate change. (Sierra Club)

CHARLESTOWN, W.Va. – What will the Trump Administration do with Obama air-pollution limits designed to slow climate change? The U.S. Supreme Court ruled the federal government has to cut greenhouse gasses, including CO2 from existing power plants, but the feds' Clean Power Plan has been stalle

Utilities in southern coastal states are cleaning up the coal ash left from decades of power generation. (Sierra Club)

CHARLESTON, W.V. — As Congress debates the issue, utilities and communities in southeastern states are moving ahead with clean up of millions of tons of coal ash in impoundments at power plants. Until recently, Congress had been deadlocked regarding this legacy of a coal-powered century. In

Documents show nearly 50 containers of low-level radioactive West Virginia fracking waste was dumped into a Kentucky landfill, amid regulatory confusion and questionable business practices. (WV DHHR)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Behind the low-level radioactive waste dumped in a Kentucky landfill are regulatory loopholes and questionable business practices, according to state and local documents. Tom FitzGerald, director of the Kentucky Resources Council, obtained correspondence between Kentucky and Wes

The disposal of low-level radioactive waste derived from Marcellus and Utica shale in Kentucky landfills is raising red flags. (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

CHARLESTON W.Va. - The paper trail of a company that dumped West Virginia radioactive frack waste into Kentucky landfills is raising serious questions. This spring, regulators cited Advanced TENORM Services for dumping the low-level radioactive waste in two municipal landfills. Not long after, the c

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