Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - November 21, 2017 


The Trump administration shows 50 thousand Haitians the door; also on the rundown; graduate students say the GOP Tax Bill is a primary concern; net neutrality in the balance today; plus a look at whether music can be a deterrent to juvenile crime.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WV: Criminal Justice

Charleston Attorney Rico Moore helped write a packet of instructions for people interested in taking advantage of West Virginia's Second Chance for Employment Act. (BlackLight Initiative/Facebook)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – A new organization is seeing huge interest in helping folks use West Virginia's new Second Chance law. The BlackLight Initiative has been spreading the word about what it takes for former felons to have their convictions on their criminal records reduced to misdemeanors u

A group of protesters at the West Virginia State Capitol, awaiting the arrival of U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Tom Price. (Public News Service-Dan Heyman) (Note: photo was originally misidentified. Heyman took the photo, he was not in it.)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. - Reporter Dan Heyman, who covers West Virginia and Virginia for Public News Service, was arrested inside the State Capitol in Charleston on Tuesday afternoon. Heyman was at the Capitol to cover a visit by U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price and White House adviser

Retired Army Lt. Col. Teresa James says it's important for counselors to understand why victims of sexual assault in the military, like her, often don't speak up. (Teresa James)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. -- A retired army lieutenant colonel is telling her story of surviving sexual assault, and explaining to social workers what it's like to have her commanders retaliate against her for speaking out. Teresa James was nearing the end of her career with the West Virginia National Gua

West Virginia is one of only a few states with rising levels of young people behind bars, and advocates say part of the issue is a lack of behavioral health care. (WV Virginia Center on Budget and Policy)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – Lack of behavioral health care for children may be undermining West Virginia's efforts to reduce truancy, cut juvenile incarceration and improve foster care, advocates say. They pointed to surveys showing that a much higher than average portion of state high school stude

Jim Justice, the Democratic Party candidate for West Virginia governor, says the state has no choice but to find the money to pay for more drug treatment. (Dan Heyman)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – Billionaire and gubernatorial candidate Jim Justice is forcefully calling for more drug treatment. But he's vague on how West Virginia could pay for more treatment centers. West Virginia is battling a big budget deficit while, as Justice puts it, opioid addiction has the

Marshall University counseling professor Carol Smith says new research about how trauma can change the brain shows a lot of practical promise. (Dan Heyman)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. - A new understanding of how trauma changes the brain shows promise of helping with crime, education, health care, even parenting. Marshall University professor of counseling Carol Smith says traumatic injuries can be emotional or physical. She says the bad news is they can cha

Backed by extensive new research and a compelling personal story, Virginia social worker Allison Jackson comes to Charleston with big news about public health. (Courtesy of Jackson)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – To improve public health, count the ACEs – the Adverse Childhood Experiences. That's the message coming to a social workers' conference in Charleston. Virginia social worker Allison Jackson comes backed with a lot of new research and a compelling personal story.

One in 10 West Virginia children has the traumatic experience of having a parent incarcerated at some point during their youth. (iStock)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. - About one in 10 West Virginia children has to grow up with a parent behind bars at some point. According to a new report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation, that can hurt them for life. The report, called "A Shared Sentence," says 34,000 West Virginia children will have had

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