Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - November 17, 2017 


The Keystone oil pipeline spills big time in South Dakota; a look at the GOP tax plan and it’s impact on the most vulnerable Americans; and renewed hope for Maine’s Katahdin Woods and Waters national monument.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WY: Livable Wages/Working Families

Economists are headed to Jackson Hole to urge the Federal Reserve to raise its inflation target to spur higher wages and more jobs. (Getty Images)

JACKSON HOLE, Wyo. – The nation's most powerful bankers are descending on Jackson Hole this week for the Federal Reserve's annual economic symposium, and they'll be met by a coalition of labor and policy groups who want a say in how the economy is mapped out. Shawn Sebastian, co-director of

On Wednesday, U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke lifted a moratorium on new coal leases, but only 38 percent of Trump voters think coal should be a priority. (Gage_Skidmore/Wikimedia Commons)

CHEYENNE, Wyo. -- President Donald Trump's energy policies, promising a new era of job creation by shoring up fossil fuels, could put the brakes on renewable energy - the energy sector's largest job creator. Connie Wilbert, president of the Sierra Club's Wyoming chapter, points to new analysis of

Report: Solar- and wind-related jobs could absorb coal-industry layoffs. (Pixabay)

CHEYENNE, Wyo. - The growth of solar- and wind-related jobs could easily absorb coal-industry layoffs over the next 15 years and provide full-time careers, if investments are made to retrain workers. That's according to a new study by researchers at Oregon State University and the Michigan Technolog

If the federal minimum wage had grown at the same pace as worker productivity, it would be nearly $19 an hour in 2016. (Economic Policy Institute)

CHEYENNE, Wyo. - This summer marks the seven-year anniversary of the last time the federal minimum wage was raised, from $6.55 to $7.25 an hour, and the buying power of those dollars has fallen by 10 percent because of inflation, according to new analysis from the Economic Policy Institute. David

Research shows identity theft facilitated by companies is common in migrant farm work. (Pixabay)

CHEYENNE, Wyo. -- Farm workers are frequently forced into becoming identity thieves in order to get jobs, according to a new report from theUniversity of Colorado. The research showed that many agribusiness companies routinely give migrant workers who can't legally work in the U.S. valid documenta

At the current rate of progress, women in Wyoming will not earn as much as men until the year 2159. (Pixabay)

CHEYENNE, Wy. - It's been 53 years since President John F. Kennedy signed the Equal Pay Act into law, and women are still paid on average 79 cents for every $1 a man makes. Julie Anderson, research associate with the Institute for Women's Policy Research, says if current trends continue, women in

A new survey shows state residents support accepting federal dollars to expand Medicaid health coverage. (Monkeybusinessimages/iStockphoto)

CHEYENNE, Wyo. - A new survey conducted by the University of Wyoming's Center for Energy Economics and Public Policy shows state residents support efforts by the Legislature to balance the state's budget, but disagree with lawmakers' decision not to accept federal funding for Medicaid expansion. Wyo

Two new reports show what it takes for Wyoming families to get by without public or private assistance. (Wyoming Women's Foundation)

CHEYENNE, Wyo. - Two new reports released today by the Wyoming Women's Foundation show what it takes for families to get by without public or private assistance, and how to achieve economic security. The first report calculates a Self-Sufficiency Standard for each county based on "bare bones" bud

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