PNS National Newscast

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the Public News Service (podcast)"
"Hey Google, play the Public News Service podcast"
"Alexa, play Public News Service podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

2020Talks

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Hey Google, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Alexa, play Two-Thousand-Twenty Talks podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - May 13, 2021 


President Biden taps Tracy Stone-Manning to be director of Bureau of Land Management; and Colorado schools get new tools to help students distinguish between news, commentary and disinformation.


2021Talks - May 13, 2021 


Republicans oust Liz Cheney from her leadership role, Dr. Anthony Fauci urges more vaccinations, NAACP leaders voice support for voting rights legislation, and Nancy Pelosi is optimistic about the infrastructure bill.

Child Care “Crisis” to Impact NY Economy?

Downloading Audio

Click to download

We love that you want to share our Audio! And it is helpful for us to know where it is going.
Media outlets that are interested in downloading content should go to www.newsservice.org
Click Here if you do not already have an account and need to sign up.
Please do it now, as the option to download our audio packages is ending soon

There's a crisis in child care in New York State and the economy and society will suffer in the long run. That's what a new study from business leaders and alarming calls from child care advocates in the field add up to. Photo courtesy Child Care Council of Suffolk, Inc.
There's a crisis in child care in New York State and the economy and society will suffer in the long run. That's what a new study from business leaders and alarming calls from child care advocates in the field add up to. Photo courtesy Child Care Council of Suffolk, Inc.
 By Mark ScheererContact
February 25, 2013

MELVILLE, N.Y. - Diminished funds, increasing costs and lowered eligibility are creating a "perfect storm" that has New York's child care program at the breaking point. That's the warning from advocates and a new report from business leaders.

Janet Walerstein with the Child Care Council of Suffolk said the number of families receiving the child care subsidy dropped drastically in Suffolk County from 2011 to 2012, leaving more than 2,000 children at risk. She said parents are withdrawing their children from quality programs and placing them in less reliable options - or leaving them home alone.

"There are parents crying on the phone," she said. "They can't afford the child care. What are they going to do?"

Meanwhile, the new report from Long Island business leaders applauded Gov. Cuomo's proposed $25 million increase in funding for full-day Pre-K in high-needs districts, but it also urged that this funding be used wisely.

Michael DeLouise, chairman of the Melville Chamber of Commerce, hailed the report by America's Edge, which cited studies showing children who participate in high-quality early learning programs are more likely to excel, academically and financially, as adults. He said that translates into impressive returns, as much as $16 for every $1 invested.

"That is a tremendous relief to our economy as we go along," he said. "Instead of filling up our prisons, we should be filling up our science labs. That's really what this is all about."

Janet Walerstein said Cuomo's effort to expand full-day pre-K is commendable, but more needs to be done.

"We thank the governor for his commitment to pre-kindergarten," she said, "but learning doesn't start at age 4. Learning starts from birth. Parents are going back to work when children are 6 weeks old. What is happening with support that families need?"

DeLouise said investments in high-quality early care and education have a "multiplier effect," giving an immediate boost to New York businesses and long-term economic benefits through a more skilled future workforce.

"New York State right now has a commitment for $25 million dollars in their budget," DeLouise said. "So, what is that going to mean? It'll repay itself 16 times. And they're looking at maybe putting quite a bit more, maybe as much as $75 million in it."

In Suffolk County, as elsewhere in the state, advocates have called for a change in the allocation formula for the child care subsidy.

Best Practices