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PNS Daily Newscast - April 16, 2021 


Florida's Republican lawmakers voted overwhelmingly to pass the so-called "anti-riot" bill; disturbing police camera video of the fatal shooting of a 13-year-old in Chicago.


2021Talks - April 15, 2021 


With overwhelming bipartisan support, the Senate takes up anti-Asian American hate crimes legislation, and President Biden officially announces a full military withdrawal from Afghanistan.

Public News Service - MO: Disabilities

Medical physicists are starting to play a bigger role in hospitals across the country. (Children's Mercy)

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KANSAS CITY, Mo. - More and more hospitals across the country are starting to add full-time medical physicists to their staffs. That's the case at Children's Mercy Kansas City. Dr. Nima Kasraie is the first full-time physicist in the hospital's Department of Radiology, and his goal is to make sur

March is Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month. Advocates say we've come a long way in accepting people with differences. (Victoria Jordan)

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OZARK, Missouri - In 1987 President Ronald Reagan declared March Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month, calling on Americans to provide the "encouragement and opportunities" necessary for people with developmental disabilities to reach their potential. Jan Jones is director of Abilities First

Students on high school and college campuses across the country are part of a project to end food waste and feed needy people in their communities. (The Campus Kitchens Project)

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ST. LOUIS, MO - On college campuses across the country, student volunteers are working to put an end to food waste and at the same time are helping in their communities to feed the needy. Some high schools also take part in The Campus Kitchens Project. In Missouri, there are programs at St. Lou

States that expanded Medicaid had greatly reduced rates of uninsured workers, while states that did not, such as Missouri, showed half as much progress. (familiesusa.org)

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JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. - A report released this week by Families USA shows states that expanded Medicaid had, on average, a 25 percent reduction in the rate of uninsured workers. But since Missouri was one of eight states that has not expanded Medicaid since 2014, the decline was only 13 percent. Dee

A tablet app is helping change and improve care for babies born with heart defects. (Children's Mercy)

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KANSAS CITY, Mo. - Tablet computers aren't just for fun and games. With new data showing the success of an app developed for babies born with heart defects, doctors at Children's Mercy say this sort of technology can be lifesaving. Since March of 2014, the Cardiac High-Acuity Monitoring Program, o

While formal training builds skills and confidence, the new CPR guidelines stress that a cellphone and a willingness to step in can save lives. Credit: Rama/Wikimedia Commons

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ST. LOUIS - When someone is having a stroke or heart attack, you don't need formal training to save a life, according to the newly-released Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) guidelines from the American Heart Association. Douglas Randell, an officer with the EMS training programs for the St. Lou

PHOTO: They put their own lives on hold for their nation, and now a new program aims to give back to those veterans who have fallen on hard times. Photo credit: ladyheart/morguefile.com.

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SPRINGFIELD, Mo. - They served their nation and in many cases put their own lives on the line, but a large number of Missouri veterans are now homeless, which is why one nonprofit is reaching out to help connect them with the resources and skills they need to get back on their feet. Matthew Galli

PHOTO: Health-insurance advocates are focusing on one-on-one assistance for Missourians during this second ACA open-enrollment period, based on feedback from the first time around. Image courtesy of Cover Missouri.

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ST. LOUIS, Mo. - When it comes to open enrollment for health-insurance plans through the Affordable Care Act, experts say in many ways, the second time is the charm. With the kinks worked out of the federal "Healthcare.gov" website and more options to choose from, Ryan Barker, vice president of heal

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