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PNS Daily Newscast - December 8, 2017 


In focus on our Friday rundown; two members of Congress are stepping down over sexual misconduct allegations; the BLM suspends natural gas waste standards; and we have a noted historian's take on the GOP Tax plan.

Daily Newscasts

Documentary Featuring Fargo Clinic Wins Prize

The director of the Red River Women's Clinic praises escorts for the support they provide to patients. (Marc Faletti/Rewire Multimedia)
The director of the Red River Women's Clinic praises escorts for the support they provide to patients. (Marc Faletti/Rewire Multimedia)
November 20, 2017

FARGO, N.D. – A documentary featuring a Fargo clinic that offers abortion services has won the prize for best documentary short at the Nevada Film Festival.

The film "Care in Chaos" compares the experiences of women at the Red River Women's Clinic in Fargo and a clinic in Charlotte, N.C., during the 40 Days for Life protest staged every year.

A year on, clinic director Tammi Kromenaker says there's less involvement in the 40 Days for Life protest, although she doesn't believe it's because of the documentary.

She says one of the clinic's great strengths is its engagement with the community.

"We're not out there screaming and yelling,” she states. “We're out there going, 'This isn't fair. This isn't right. Abortion is health care. Our patients should not be harassed and bullied as they're entering.'

“And then people get to see it. They drive by it. We're very visible, and I think that that opens people's eyes a lot to it."

"Care in Chaos" highlights the role law enforcement is playing to provide a safe environment for staff and patients at the Fargo clinic.

At the Charlotte clinic, by contrast, police use a largely hands-off approach.

Opponents of abortion argue the rights of a mother should not outweigh those of an unborn fetus.

The Fargo clinic is the only facility to provide abortion services in North Dakota. Kromenaker says anti-abortion activists around the country are looking to shut down as many clinics as they can.

"We're up to seven states now where there's only one provider,” she points out. “They want to see a clinic fall, and that's another reason, I think, why our community is so involved, is they don't want to see us go away either."

Kromenaker gives a lot of credit to the voluntary escorts that help patients to the door. She says escorts are there in any weather to provide support to patients.

Eric Tegethoff, Public News Service - ND