Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - January 22, 2018 


The funding stumble in Congress deepens the crisis for health centers; also on our nationwide rundown; we will let you know about concerns over possible "gifts" to payday lenders; and a new survey provides alarming numbers about young people and homelessness.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - CO: Livable Wages/Working Families

The percentage of low-wage earners in Colorado has been growing since 2010. (Pixabay)

DENVER – Colorado's lowest-paid workers got a raise this week as the minimum wage increased by 90 cents to $10.20 an hour. But, for workers in many parts of the state, that still isn't enough to be financially self-sufficient. Chris Stiffler, an economist with the Colorado Fiscal Institute

The price of Christmas trees is expected to increase by as much as 10 percent this year. (Pixabay)

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – For many people, Christmas is just not complete without a decorated tree inside a warm home. David Fein, who describes himself as the "lead Elf" for the all-volunteer Christmas Tree Project, has made it his mission to get free trees to families struggling financiall

Children with health coverage are more likely to finish high school and college, and have higher earnings when they enter the workforce. (Pixabay)

DENVER – Colorado's financial reserves have kept the Children's Health Insurance Program, or CHIP, running since Congress allowed funding to expire at the end of September. But Erin Miller, vice president of health initiatives with the Colorado Children's Campaign, says those reserves are al

Consumer advocates warn that tax breaks that primarily benefit corporations and the top one percent of earners could lead to cuts to Medicare and Medicaid. (Getty Images)

DENVER – As Republicans work to bridge divides between the House and Senate versions of their new tax legislation, consumer advocates are warning that the measure could have significant health consequences. By removing the Affordable Care Act's mandate for all people to buy health insurance,

The GOP's tax overhaul proposal is projected to increase the national deficit by $1.5 trillion. (Pixabay)

DENVER -- The U.S. Senate could vote on its version of the GOP tax bill as early as next week, but labor groups are not convinced the plan is in the best interests of working families. Dennis Dougherty, executive director at the Colorado AFL-CIO, said the wealthiest 1 percent of Americans would ge

The group Patriotic Millionaires projects that two-thirds of the GOP's proposed tax breaks will go to the top 1 percent of earners. (Pixabay)

DENVER – As the nation awaits details of the GOP's tax plan, a group of wealthy business leaders and investors has launched an online tool to help taxpayers see past the political rhetoric and weigh in on the new policies. Erica Payne, president of Patriotic Millionaires, points to public sp

Colorado's teen birth rate and number of abortions have dropped, and experts credit improved access to birth control. (Tim Matsui/Getty Images)

DENVER - Open enrollment for health coverage under the Affordable Care Act starts today, but women in Colorado and across the United States could find themselves paying a lot more out of pocket for birth control. President Donald Trump recently cleared the way for employers to remove contraceptive

In 2016, 235,000 SNAP recipients were Colorado children. (Pixabay)

DENVER – Groups that advocate for children, the elderly and people with disabilities are rolling up their sleeves in the wake of the budget passed last week in the U.S. House of Representatives. The measure includes $150 billion in cuts to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)

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