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PNS Daily Newscast - May 26, 2017 


Here's what we're following on today's rundown: a federal appeals court will not reinstate Trump’s revised travel ban; a shake up at the USDA could hurt rural America; and the body slamming of a reporter in Montana may be part of a bigger pattern of hostility toward journalists.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - CO: Family/Father Issues

Deportation concerns are driving many Colorado families to non-government food pantries for assistance, and to churches, where many feel safe. (Getty Images)

DENVER -- Children born in this country are U.S. citizens, regardless of their parents' immigration status, and many are eligible for health insurance coverage and food stamps. But the Trump Administration's tough talk on immigration and an uptick in ICE activity in so-called sanctuary cities, are

Women earn 80 cents for every dollar a man makes, a loss of more than $415,000 over a 40-year career, according to the National Women's Law Center. (Getty Images)

DENVER – How many moms asked for equal pay for Mother's Day? Women are now the sole or co-breadwinner in half of American families with young children, and if they were paid the same as comparable male workers, 26 million children across the U.S. would benefit, according to new analysis by t

Changes in how Medicaid is funded under the new version of the American Health Care Act could result in loss of services for people with disabilities. (Getty Images)

DENVER – The passage of a revised American Health Care Act by the U.S. House moves Medicaid one step closer to the chopping block. The plan would cut over $800 billion from the program by 2026, and opponents of that change say that puts people with disabilities and children at greatest risk.

Proponents say sanctuary-city status provides temporary protections for undocumented immigrants until Congress acts on immigration reform. (Pixabay)

LONGMONT, Colo. – As the Trump administration ramps up deportation efforts, including undocumented immigrants with no criminal record, Tuesday the Longmont City Council is set to consider a sanctuary-city proposal. Jose Beteta, executive director of the Latino Chamber of Commerce, says the m

At age 33, Grand Junction worker Jonathan Kenworthy says January’s 99 cent minimum wage boost helps him better afford life's necessities. (David Cornwell)

DENVER – Last year, Coloradans voted to increase the state's minimum wage, up 99 cents to $9.30 an hour starting in January, and workers and businesses already are feeling the impact. Advocates are hopeful it will lead to improved health outcomes, and say a raise is long overdue as the cost

A new bill aims to give former offenders in Colorado a better chance of getting a job by prohibiting most employers from asking about criminal history on initial job applications. (Surfertide/iStockphoto)

DENVER - Hundreds of thousands of Coloradans who have criminal records could catch a break on their job applications. House Bill 1305 would prohibit most employers in the state from asking about criminal history on initial application forms. According to attorney Jack Regenbogen with the Colorado C

A strong majority of Colorado voters do not want to see cuts to programs such as food stamps and subsidized school meals. (Pixabay)

DENVER -- A broad majority of Colorado voters want stronger, smarter programs to eradicate hunger, according to a new poll commissioned by Hunger Free Colorado. More than half of people surveyed said they would be more likely to vote for a candidate who prioritizes food-security programs. Benjamin

New reports show some rulings by President Trump's Supreme Court nominee have allowed schools to use force against and to isolate students with disabilities. (Wikimedia Commons)

DENVER – According to two new reports, Judge Neil Gorsuch – President Donald Trump's nominee for the U.S. Supreme Court – has repeatedly failed to protect the rights of students with disabilities. Gorsuch is set to testify before the U.S. Senate Monday. National Education Assoc

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