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PNS Daily News - June 27, 2017 


The GOP health plan would reportedly leave 22 million uninsured; part of the president’s travel ban unblocked; and the Feds agree to investigate ways to protect an endangered wild cat. Those stories and more coming up.

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Public News Service - KY: Disabilities

Helping aging Kentuckians continue living at home, by bringing their family caregivers more into the loop, is the idea behind a bill moving through the Legislature. (Greg Stotelmyer)

FRANKFORT, Ky. – A bill moving through the Kentucky Legislature would establish ways to get family caregivers more involved so their aging loved ones can continue living at home. The Kentucky Family Caregivers Act, Senate Bill 129, makes it a uniform requirement that hospitals contact a desig

A pair of bills in the Kentucky General Assembly would scale back the state's mine safety laws, a move some fear could compromise coal miners. (Greg Stotelmyer)

FRANKFORT, Ky. - Legislation that would end mandatory state safety training for mine foremen is just a House vote away from passage in the Kentucky General Assembly. The upper chamber passed Senate Bill 224, 26 to 10, last week. It would allow mine foremen to get safety training from an independ

Health-care advocates say Kentucky's transition to a single system to qualify people for Medicaid and other programs has led to long waits for help and enrollment problems. (Greg Stotelmyer)

FRANKFORT, Ky. - A "real mess." That's how one health-care advocate describes Kentucky's transition to a single system to determine eligibility for health insurance and other social services. People who depend on kynect – the state health-insurance exchange that was hailed as a model for the

Kentucky made significant gains in both health care access and coverage, according to a new study which tracks the impact of the Affordable Care Act. (Greg Stotelmyer)

LOUISVILLE, Ky. – A detailed study tracking the impact of the Affordable Care Act on Kentuckians finds significant gains in both access to health care and the number of people who have insurance. Susan Zepeda, president and CEO at the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky, says her organization

It's Family Caregivers Day at the state Capitol, and advocates for seniors are urging lawmakers to support simple ways to help those who provide care to aging loved ones. (Greg Stotelmyer)

FRANKFORT, Ky. - Kentucky needs to take common-sense steps to help the hundreds of thousands of family members who care for aging loved ones, the state's leading seniors' organization says. AARP is urging lawmakers to pass the forthcoming "Family Caregiver Act" to help Kentucky seniors stay in thei

Kentucky's new governor plans to shut down Kynect, the state's health exchange, and redirect Kentuckians to the federal marketplace for insurance. (kynect)

FRANKFORT, Ky. - The move by Kentucky's new governor to dismantle the state-based health exchange "Kynect" has consumer and health-care advocates sounding alarm bells. Emily Beauregard, executive director with Kentucky Voices for Health, wants Gov. Matt Bevin to reconsider his decision which would

Support is holding firm among Kentuckians for a statewide smoke-free law, according to new polling numbers. (Greg Stotelmyer)

LOUISVILE, Ky. - A new Kentucky Health Issues poll shows two thirds of the state's adults favor a statewide smoke-free law. The General Assembly has repeatedly rejected bills that would prohibit smoking in all public places and workplaces leaving protections from secondhand smoke up to local commun

Wait, if you can, before taking your monthly Social Security benefit. That's the advice from the National Academy of Social Insurance. Credit Greg Stotelmyer

FRANKFORT, Ky. - Social Security has been around since 1935, making it 80 years old. How old do you think you will be when you begin taking the federal insurance you've been paying into? You're eligible at 62, but the National Academy of Social Insurance says if you can afford to wait, do it, beca

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