Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - August 24, 2017 


Featured on today’s nationwide rundown Florida set to execute the first white man for killing a black person; A new study finds a minimum-wage bump of just a dollar an hour could reduce the number of child-neglect cases; and we’ll tell you why the growth of backyard chickens is hatching a salmonella outbreak.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - MT: Rural/Farming

According to the U.S. Drought Monitor, 12 percent of the state is experiencing the highest stage of drought. (droughtmonitor.unl.edu)

CIRCLE, Mont. -- Montana is suffering from wildfires and possibly the worst drought in 30 years, bringing lots of pain to farmers and ranchers. According to the U.S. Drought Monitor, 12 percent of the state is experiencing "exceptional drought," the highest level measured. The northeastern part of

About 20 percent of beef is imported, but country-of-origin labeling isn't required. (Lance Cheung/USDA)

BILLINGS, Mont. -- A group of cattle producers wants Americans to know where their beef is coming from - and is suing the U.S. Department of Agriculture to make it happen. The United Stockgrowers of America's Rancher-Cattlemen Action Legal Fund, or R-CALF, and Cattle Producers of Washington are br

Repealing the Affordable Care Act could hurt residency grant programs for doctors who serve rural areas. (Robert Daly/Getty)

BILLINGS, Mont. – As the GOP considers reviving plans to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act with a revised American Health Care Act, the move could have serious consequences for rural Montana counties. Tucked into the current system is the Teaching Health Center Grant, which helps fu

Montana added nearly 100,000 acres of organic farmland since 2016, according to a new report. (storebukkebruse/Flickr)

HELENA, Mont. - The last few years have been a growing season for organic farming in the United States. According to the Mercaris Organic Acreage Report, organic farmland reached more than four million acres this year. Montana saw a 30-percent jump over the last two years, giving it the second-most

A former environmental lawyer has written a book that says that when done correctly, livestock grazing can have some benefits for the land. (Scott Bauer/USDA)

BILLINGS, Mont. - The ancient plains of Montana once hosted herds of animals that grazed the land. Now, cattle and other domesticated animals do that work. According to former environmental lawyer and author Nicolette Hahn Niman, the planet actually is grazed far less than it used to be. Her book "

There are only about 125 pallid sturgeon left in the lower Yellowstone River. (USFWS Mountain-Prairie)

GLENDIVE, Mont. – Federal agencies say the best option for conserving the endangered pallid sturgeon is to provide a bypass channel to the Yellowstone Intake Dam. Opponents of the project not only disagree, they say that the option is a waste of money. The final Environmental Impact Statemen

Blain Hjerthaas speaks at the first Soil Summit on Saturday about a practice called

BILLINGS, Mont. – If you want to get higher yields from a farm, start with the health of the soil. That's one rule being shared by a speaker at Northern Plains Resource Council's first Soil Summit, which takes place in Billings on Saturday and is open to the public. Blain Hjertaas, a sustain

Hunting and fishing groups are cheering the defeat in the U.S. Senate of an amendment that would have lifted certain EPA protections from smaller streams. (Montana Wildlife Federation)

HELENA, Mont. – Hunting and angling groups are praising the U.S. Senate for defeating an amendment on Thursday that would have blocked certain Environmental Protection Agency clean water protections on smaller streams and tributaries. The amendment to the energy appropriations bill would hav

1 of 28 pages   1 2 3 >  Last »