Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - January 19, 2018 


It will be up to the U.S. Senate today to take the next step, if a government shutdown is to be averted; also in focus on our Friday rundown, President Trump extends Religious-Refusal Protections to health providers; and, we will tell you about a 15 year old in North Carolina who just formed a Political Action Committee.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - MT: Consumer Issues

The Montana special session brought deals to fix the budget, but national politics could throw a wrench into the mix. (Justin Brockie/Flickr)

HELENA, Mont. – The conclusion of the special legislative session has left more questions than answers for Montanans and the future of the state's budget. While a patchwork of deals appeared to cover most of the $227 million budget hole, Eric Feaver, president of the public employees' union

There are no cases of bison transferring the disease brucellosis to livestock, studies show. (Debeo Morium/Flickr)

HELENA, Mont. - Yellowstone conservation groups say the livestock industry should be the focus rather than bison or elk, to contain brucellosis. Partners in the Interagency Bison Management Plan recently announced plans to kill up to 600 bison this winter to manage risk from the disease. But Llo

Montana's wind sector has the potential to power 6.4 million homes by 2030, according to the U.S. Dept. of Energy.  (David J. LaPorte/Flickr)

BILLINGS, Mont. – How does the country move toward renewable energy in a way that benefits working families? That's one issue being addressed at the 46th annual Northern Plains Resource Council meeting on Saturday. Keynote speaker Tyson Slocum is the energy program director for Public Citize

Direct-care workers could lose out on benefits if Montana lawmakers choose to make drastic cuts to the Dept. of Health and Human Services. (Drew Tarvin/Flickr)

HELENA, Mont. – Montana home-care workers are urging the Legislature to find a better way to fill a massive hole in the state budget. The state could slash agency budgets by 10 percent in order to make up its $228-million deficit. Cuts to the Department of Health and Human Services would come

In 2016, bark beetles destroyed nearly 50,000 acres of forest in Montana, according to the U.S. Forest Service. (William M. Ciesla/Forest Health Management International)

HELENA, Mont. – Fire won't be the only natural disaster to rip through Montana forests this year. Another disaster will be using its teeth. Bark beetles have long been a nuisance for wooded areas of the West, and scientists say climate change is making the land more susceptible to the beetl

Attorney General Jeff Sessions reversed President Barack Obama's efforts to phase out private prisons. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

HELENA, Mont. – Montana has the nation's second largest population incarcerated in private prisons. According to the criminal justice reform group The Sentencing Project, the state's private prison population grew by 50 percent between 2000 and 2015, and now tops 40 percent of the people in

Estimates from 2016 found there are about 690 grizzly bears in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. (Jim Peaco/Yellowstone National Park)

MISSOULA, Mont. – Conservation groups are challenging in court the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's decision to strip Yellowstone grizzly bears of endangered species protection. The lawsuit was filed Wednesday in U.S. District Court in Missoula and says Fish and Wildlife's decision to take g

Rancher Seth Newton has been concerned for years about a radioactive oil waste facility upstream from his property. (Northern Plains Resource Council)

HELENA, Mont. – After more than four years of urging, the Montana Department of Environmental Quality has released draft rules to oversee the disposal of radioactive oil waste in the state. Since 2013, the Oaks Disposal facility near Glendive has been the destination for more than 250,000 to

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