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PNS Daily News - July 26, 2017 


Here’s a look at some of our stories: 20 hours of Senate legislative debate could mean the end of Obamacare; the Justice Department once again takes aim at sanctuary cities; and a push for equality as landmark legislation marks a milestone.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - ND: Budget Policy & Priorities

A Congressional Budget Office report found 23 million fewer Americans could have health care by 2026 if the American Health Care Act is passed. (skeeze/Pixabay)

BISMARCK, N.D. - AARP representatives from North Dakota and across the country are in the nation's capital today to ask members of Congress to consider older Americans during their health-care deliberations. AARP North Dakota President Kathi Schwan is meeting with Sens. John Hoeven, R-N.D., and Hei

About 4.7 percent of doctors in North Dakota are part of the H-1B visa program, the highest rate in the country. (sasint/Pixabay)

BISMARCK, N.D. – Medical professionals in North Dakota are facing pressure from all sides, feeling the pains of a growing shortage of doctors and potential changes to a visa program that helps supply doctors and wondering what will happen to health insurance at the federal level. President D

The North Dakota Legislature passed one piece of legislation aimed at helping caregivers this session.(Public.Resource.Org/Flickr)

BISMARCK, N.D. — Family caregivers in the Peace Garden State went 1-for-2 in bills supporting their work from the North Dakota Legislature. The bills were designed to help the state's roughly 62,000 family caregivers. The first, House Bill 1038, upped the resources for caregivers to get rest

Oil and gas companies lose about $330 million a year to methane venting, flaring and leaking on public lands. (Tim Evanson/Flickr)

BISMARCK, N.D. – Congress could decide as soon as this week the fate of the Methane and Waste Prevention Rule, and North Dakotans who see the greatest impact from this regulation are speaking up. Members of Congress are considering repealing the Bureau of Land Management rule, which limits t

North Dakota is the largest producer of barley and many other cereal grains in the United States. (Krista Lundgren/USFWS)

BISMARCK, N.D. – While negotiations over the next farm bill in Congress may seem distant, North Dakota farmers hope the 2018 bill can make their work more sustainable. The improving economy has helped the country dig out of the Great Recession, but it also means farmers are getting less for wh

New federal rules could lead to cuts in waste gas flaring from North Dakota oil fields, but the state and some oil and gas producers have opposed them. (WildEarth Guardians/Flickr)

BISMARCK, N.D. -- The Bureau of Land Management issued some new rules that are irking the oil and gas industry, but the agency says they were proposed for their health and environmental benefits. The regulations are expected to reduce the amount of gas flared or released from oil wells. During the

North Dakota leads the nation in committing funds for programs to prevent kids and adults from smoking. (American Cancer Society)

BISMARCK, N.D. – North Dakota's efforts are leading the nation to keep kids away from tobacco and help those that do smoke, quit. A national report lists North Dakota as one of only two states in the country that funds tobacco prevention and cessation programs at levels recommended by the Cent

North Dakota Farmers Union President Mark Watne says low commodity prices are causing financial pain among farmers. (NDFU.org)

BISMARCK, N.D. - Low commodity and livestock prices are putting increasing stress on agriculture producers across the country. Despite a growing world population, crop production is greater than demand, leading to lower prices. Mark Watne, president of the North Dakota Farmers Union, said farmers c

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