Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - November 17, 2017 


The Keystone oil pipeline spills big time in South Dakota; a look at the GOP tax plan and it’s impact on the most vulnerable Americans; and renewed hope for Maine’s Katahdin Woods and Waters national monument.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - ND: Community Issues and Volunteering

The Cardiac Ready Communities project has four parts, including CPR training and making sure there is public access to AEDs. (Anita Hart/Flickr)

BISMARCK, N.D. -- The American Heart Association is helping North Dakota communities prepare to save lives by presenting nearly $100,000 to the North Dakota Department of Health to support the Cardiac Ready Communities project. The funds were collected over the last few years on Giving Hearts Day,

About 21.5 million Americans 12 and older were classified with substance dependence or abuse in 2014. (Sacred Heart/Flickr)

FARGO, N.D. -- September is National Recovery Month, and health professionals are focusing on the power of families and communities for people on the road to recovery. More than 50,000 North Dakotans suffered from Substance Abuse Disorder at some point in 2014, according to the most recent data fr

Speaking to someone who is showing warning signs of committing suicide is one of the most important tools for preventing it. (Department of Defense/Wikimedia Commons)

BISMARCK, N.D. -- North Dakotans are coming out from the shadows to speak up about suicide and suicide prevention. The Bismarck/Mandan Out of the Darkness Community Walk on Friday will support the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention and its goal to reduce the suicide rate 20 percent by 2025.

A bill in the North Dakota Legislature would help communities become

BISMARCK, N.D. -- A number of towns in North Dakota are taking steps to become "Cardiac Ready" communities, and a bill in the Legislature would set up a grant program to assist them. Dr. Jeff Sather, Medical Director of the Emergency Trauma Center at Trinity Health in Minot, said the program help

Chairman Archambault (left) and Chief Arvol Looking Horse are involved in the latest fight against the Dakota Access Pipeline that also spotlights decades of racial discrimination against Native populations in North Dakota. (Photo by Jenni Monet)

BISMARCK, N.D. - For many members of the Lakota Sioux Tribe, the battle against the Dakota Access Pipeline is just the latest symptom of a longstanding racial divide in North Dakota. Native Americans in the state are jailed and live in poverty at much higher rates than their white neighbors, and so

Native Americans have been protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline since April. (Red Warrior Camp)

BISMARCK, N.D. – The controversial Dakota Access Pipeline project could be permanently shut down today, pending a federal judge's decision. Members of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe of North and South Dakota are suing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Tribal members say the agency issued impro

North Dakota food growers are being asked to help get a quarter-million pounds of fresh produce to thousands of hungry kids and seniors in the state. (North Dakota Department of Agriculture)

BISMARCK, N.D. -- For many North Dakota farmers and gardeners, August is harvest time, and the state's Department of Agriculture is asking them to help meet the needs of thousands of hungry people. More than 93,000 children, families and seniors in the state rely on food assistance every year. To

A group of Native American youth are running 2,000 miles to protest construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. (iStockphoto)

BISMARCK, N.D. - A 2,000-mile journey to fight for clean water and land is making its way through Maryland. Native American youths are running from North Dakota to Washington, D.C., to protest a pipeline that would cross several states and could threaten tribal lands. The Dakota Access Pipeline woul

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