Newscasts

Updated PNS Daily Newscast - September, 22 2017 


The news we're following on today's rundown: Facebook turns over Russia-linked ads to Congress; how Senate Republicans’ new health-care bill could hurt the fight against the opioid epidemic; and Texas food banks prepare to serve the long-term needs of Harvey victims.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - ND: Consumer Issues

Nearly 50 percent of North Dakota is experiencing extreme or exceptional drought, the two highest stages of drought. (National Drought Mitigation Center)

SOUTH HEART, N.D. – North Dakota farmer Bob Kuylen says he's mowed his lawn once this summer. Normally it's at least once a week. Kuylen farms near South Heart in the southwestern part of the state, colored the darkest red on drought maps, marking that the area is in the highest stage of d

North Dakotans in the Bakken region, where oil production is most heavily concentrated, have reported health problems they believe are the result of air pollution. (Tim Evanson/Flickr)

BISMARCK, N.D. – North Dakotans are still fighting air pollution, even as the Environmental Protection Agency takes the next steps toward removing regulations on methane-flaring at oil and gas well sites. A new report from the Dakota Resource Council finds methane is affecting local resident

Sen. John Hoeven, R-N.D., has become integral to the GOP's efforts to pass health-care reform. (Bob Nichols/U.S. Dept. of Agriculture)

FARGO, N.D – Sen. John Hoeven of North Dakota has become a key vote for Republicans looking to pass health-care reform. As support for the legislation waned, including from Hoeven, leaders in the Senate pushed back a vote on their bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. With the

The flagship Founding Farmers restaurant near the White House has been the most requested restaurant for dinner reservations anywhere in the U.S. on the website OpenTable.com for five years running.  (Founding Farmers/Flickr)

BISMARCK, N.D. – A number of Washington-area restaurants are serving food from a faraway place: North Dakota's family farms. There are five Founding Farmers restaurants located in and around the nation's capital with another two on the way. The restaurants' message? Small farms across the

About 4.7 percent of doctors in North Dakota are part of the H-1B visa program, the highest rate in the country. (sasint/Pixabay)

BISMARCK, N.D. – Medical professionals in North Dakota are facing pressure from all sides, feeling the pains of a growing shortage of doctors and potential changes to a visa program that helps supply doctors and wondering what will happen to health insurance at the federal level. President D

Oil and gas companies lose about $330 million a year to methane venting, flaring and leaking on public lands. (Tim Evanson/Flickr)

BISMARCK, N.D. – Congress could decide as soon as this week the fate of the Methane and Waste Prevention Rule, and North Dakotans who see the greatest impact from this regulation are speaking up. Members of Congress are considering repealing the Bureau of Land Management rule, which limits t

New federal rules could lead to cuts in waste gas flaring from North Dakota oil fields, but the state and some oil and gas producers have opposed them. (WildEarth Guardians/Flickr)

BISMARCK, N.D. -- The Bureau of Land Management issued some new rules that are irking the oil and gas industry, but the agency says they were proposed for their health and environmental benefits. The regulations are expected to reduce the amount of gas flared or released from oil wells. During the

North Dakota leads the nation in committing funds for programs to prevent kids and adults from smoking. (American Cancer Society)

BISMARCK, N.D. – North Dakota's efforts are leading the nation to keep kids away from tobacco and help those that do smoke, quit. A national report lists North Dakota as one of only two states in the country that funds tobacco prevention and cessation programs at levels recommended by the Cent

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