Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - January 16, 2018  


New Medicaid work requirements could leave many without coverage, we get perspective from Utah; also on the rundown, a look at the impact of the Trump administrations efforts to erase references to climate change; and Reading Partners Baltimore inspires struggling readers.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WA: Environment

Even low levels of three commonly-used pesticides can cause abnormal development of salmon. (William M. Ciesla/USDA Forest Service)

SEATTLE – A trio of widely-used pesticides threatens Northwest salmon and the orca that rely on them, even with these species on the brink of extinction. That's according to a biological opinion from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's fisheries office that the environmenta

Wildfires raged across Washington state this year and scientists point to climate change as the reason for their intensity. (USFS/Flickr)

SEATTLE – This year the media seemed to follow President Donald Trump's every move in the White House with bated breath. But did that leave other big stories uncovered? Lisa Hymas, climate and energy program director at Media Matters, a progressive media watchdog group, argues it did, and th

Northwest tribes oppose the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion, which could increase oil tanker traffic in the Strait of Juan de Fuca sevenfold. (Mark Klotz/Flickr)

SEATTLE – This year, Native tribes have been at the forefront of opposition against expanding oil and gas transport in the Northwest. They say the latest threat to the environment and their way of life is the Trans Mountain Pipeline through British Columbia – and Houston-based Kinder M

Northwest orcas are suffering from a lack of food, particularly salmon. (Ingrid Taylar/Flickr)

SEATTLE -- The devastating video of a starving polar bear has pulled on Americans' heartstrings this week. And scientists say West Coast orcas are in a similarly dire situation. The population of southern resident killer whales dropped to 76, the lowest number in 30 years. Southern residents are t

Washington state ranks fourth in the nation for Christmas tree production. (Brian Mize/The Nature Conservancy)

CLE ELUM, Wash. – With the holiday season here, many Washingtonians have an important decision to make: Should they buy a real or artificial Christmas tree? While it may seem as though cutting down a tree is not a green decision, there are actually benefits for the environment and local co

Rotational grazing of cattle could help soil better sequester carbon and help fight climate change. (U.S. Department of Agriculture/Flickr)

VANCOUVER, Wash. -- A pivotal tool for fighting climate change could be hiding deep below our feet. Researchers have found soil holds more than three-times as much carbon as the atmosphere, and that minerals deep in the dirt are key to its storage. With better land management, they say, this capac

The Prescribed Fire Training Exchange is taking place in north central Washington, mainly on Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest land. (The Nature Conservancy)

PLAIN, Wash. -- The state is hosting its first-ever Prescribed Fire Training Exchange as another devastating fire season comes to an end. Over this week and the next, agencies and groups will come together in north central Washington to trade tips on managing blazes and to explore the use of fire

The Millennium Bulk Terminal that was slated to be built in Longview would have shipped up to 44 million tons of coal a year to Asia. (Sam Beebe/Flickr)

LONGVIEW, Wash. - A proposal for what would be the largest coal-export terminal in North America might have sunk on Tuesday. A coalition of community, tribal and business leaders is hailing the Washington Department of Ecology's decision to deny a water-quality permit to developers of the Millenniu

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