PNS Daily Newscast - March 22, 2018 

New research finds stiffer prison terms do not deter drug use. Also on our nationwide rundown: We take you to a state where 4 in 10 adults have guns; and “ghost” fishing gear is killing whales and seals in oceans.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WA: Environment

The Olympic Peninsula is recognized as a World Heritage Site because of its old-growth forests. (The Nature Conservancy)

FORKS, Wash. – The Washington Legislature has set aside $1 million in the capital budget for management of land and rivers on the Olympic Peninsula, home to forests recognized the world over. It also will become the site of an experiment in restoration. The Nature Conservancy is using lessons

Groups like Chaplain on the Harbor will be in Renton on Saturday recruiting for this year's Poor People's Campaign. (Poor People's Campaign)

RENTON, Wash. – In 1968, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. launched the Poor People's Campaign. A half-century later, the campaign is still going – and this week, its organizers held events at state capitols calling for a "moral revival" across the country. On Saturday, groups including Chap

Worsening wildfires are a concern if Washington state lawmakers don't find ways to give businesses more incentive to reduce carbon emissions. (LDELD/Flickr)

OLYMPIA, Wash. – The Washington state Senate is considering a bill outlined by Gov. Jay Inslee that would make polluters pay – and use the money to invest in clean jobs and keeping natural resources resilient. Senate Bill 6203 would tax carbon polluters, with the funds used to speed up

Gov. Jay Inslee has rejected an oil terminal that would have sent 360,000 barrels of oil a day through the Columbia River Gorge. (Kat Holmes/Washington Environmental Council)

VANCOUVER, Wash. – Gov. Jay Inslee has delivered the final blow in the long battle over a proposed oil terminal in Vancouver. On Monday, Inslee agreed with the recommendation of the Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council (EFSEC), which voted unanimously at the end of last year to reject the

WSU researchers have developed a micro-particle they say can be fed to bees to help them withstand exposure to pesticides. (Photo courtesy of Brandon Hopkins and Waled Suliman.)

PULLMAN, Wash. – Two Washington State University researchers have been recognized for their development of a food supplement that helps bee colonies survive the toxic effects of pesticides. Brandon Hopkins and Waled Suliman developed a carbon micro-particle beekeepers can add to meals that r

Even low levels of three commonly-used pesticides can cause abnormal development of salmon. (William M. Ciesla/USDA Forest Service)

SEATTLE – A trio of widely-used pesticides threatens Northwest salmon and the orca that rely on them, even with these species on the brink of extinction. That's according to a biological opinion from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's fisheries office that the environmenta

Wildfires raged across Washington state this year and scientists point to climate change as the reason for their intensity. (USFS/Flickr)

SEATTLE – This year the media seemed to follow President Donald Trump's every move in the White House with bated breath. But did that leave other big stories uncovered? Lisa Hymas, climate and energy program director at Media Matters, a progressive media watchdog group, argues it did, and th

Northwest tribes oppose the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion, which could increase oil tanker traffic in the Strait of Juan de Fuca sevenfold. (Mark Klotz/Flickr)

SEATTLE – This year, Native tribes have been at the forefront of opposition against expanding oil and gas transport in the Northwest. They say the latest threat to the environment and their way of life is the Trans Mountain Pipeline through British Columbia – and Houston-based Kinder M

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