Newscasts

PNS Weekend Newscast - July 22nd, 2017 


Here's a look at what we're covering: The new White House communications director is expressing his love and loyalty to Donald Trump, more meetings between then Senator Jeff Sessions and the Russians being disclosed, and environmental groups say drilling in New York has contaminated wells.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WA: Toxics

The prototype for a battery-free cell phone developed at the University of Washington was built with cheap, off-the-shelf components. (Mark Stone/University of Washington)

SEATTLE – Cell-phone users are excited that the prototype for a battery-free cell phone might mean they could cut the cord to their chargers in the future. But the developing technology also may be a boon for the environment. Developed at the University of Washington, the battery-free cell p

The Hanford Nuclear Reservation is the most contaminated nuclear site in the U.S. (Philo Nordlund/Flickr)

RICHLAND, Wash. – Radioactive contamination is spreading at an aging facility on the Hanford Nuclear Reservation, according to a report from the U.S. Department of Energy. The REDOX complex last processed plutonium 50 years ago, but annual inspections by the DOE have found the radiation is sp

The EPA has until November to finalize new rules, known as fish consumption rules, for water quality standards in Washington. (pixabay)

SEATTLE - A U.S. federal judge has told the EPA it must finalize new water-quality rules aimed at making Washington state waters cleaner. The rules are known as fish consumption rules because they must ensure that fish caught in Washington state waters are safe to eat. Last year, the EPA said Washin

In 2011, the EPA released its first-ever findings of environmental discrimination in a case of pesticide spray near a California school. (Chafer Machinery/Flickr)

SEATTLE - The Environmental Protection Agency rarely investigates complaints from minority communities that allege local environmental regulations are discriminatory. According to the Center for Public Integrity, only one of seven cases in Washington state has been accepted for investigation sinc

The Dog Aging Project is recruiting dogs in middle age to participate in the study of a drug that could extend the pets' lives. (pixabay)

SEATTLE - Researchers from the University of Washington are studying a drug that could extend the lives of dogs and one day, maybe even humans. The drug rapamycin, typically used to treat organ-transplant patients, could be used at low doses to slow the aging process, attacking cancer and other ag

At full strength, a proposed coal-export terminal in Longview would ship 44 million tons of coal overseas each year. (Sam Beebe/Ecotrust)

PASCO, Wash. – Supporters and opponents are gathering in Pasco today for the final public hearing on a massive coal-export terminal in Longview. Meetings were held in Longview and Spokane last week after the release of an environmental impact study by the Washington State Department of Ecolo

The House and Senate are updating the 40-year-old Toxic Substances Control Act to regulate cancer-causing chemicals more quickly. (Pixabay)

SEATTLE - Today is World Cancer Day, and if you look around, you might find household items contaminated with potentially cancer-causing toxins. Some states, including Washington, have done their duty to ban chemicals linked to cancer like bisphenol-A, found in baby bottles and canned food liners,

Spokane-area residents pack an Oct. 27 meeting about Avista's continued use of power generated from coal. Courtesy: Sierra Club

SPOKANE, Wash. – Avista, the electric utility that serves much of eastern Washington, is planning its next 20 years of power output – and some customers aren't happy that part of it is coal power. The public comment period ends Friday evening on Avista's 20-year Integrated Resource Pla

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