Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - June 23, 2017 


Today on the rundown: the Senate GOP releases a draft of their health-care bill; Tropical Storm Cindy is bringing heavy rainfall to the South; and could Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ “tough on drugs” approach fuel mass incarceration?

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WA: Energy Policy

Utility company Avista is working with Spokane-area universities to develop more efficient electric grids. (Washington State University)

SPOKANE, Wash. -- Two utility companies in Washington have been awarded $3.5 million each from the state's Clean Energy Fund for research into making city electric grids more efficient. Their projects are just the beginning of efforts to make cities smarter. Spokane-based Avista Utilities will use

A large hole, seen at the top of the picture, developed over a tunnel at the Hanford site. The tunned contains rail cars containing radioactive waste. (U.S. Department of Energy)

RICHLAND, Wash. - Workers were evacuated Tuesday after the roof of a tunnel containing rail cars with radioactive material collapsed at the Hanford nuclear site. No one was injured, but the U.S. Department of Energy issued an emergency alert and around 3,000 employees in the surrounding areas were o

Northwest tribes are fighting the proposed expansion of the TransMountian Pipeline, which would stretch from the Alberta tar sands to Puget Sound. (Stop Carbon Pollution/Flickr)

SEATTLE – The mother of all pipelines could be coming to the Northwest, and Native Americans in the region want their voices heard on the proposal. The Houston-based company, Kinder Morgan's expanded TransMountain Pipeline would stretch from the Alberta tar sands to Puget Sound and could tra

The Hanford Nuclear Reservation is the most contaminated nuclear site in the U.S. (Philo Nordlund/Flickr)

RICHLAND, Wash. – Radioactive contamination is spreading at an aging facility on the Hanford Nuclear Reservation, according to a report from the U.S. Department of Energy. The REDOX complex last processed plutonium 50 years ago, but annual inspections by the DOE have found the radiation is sp

Washington state is looking to learn from other states how to develop community solar projects. (naturalflow/Flickr)

OLYMPIA, Wash. – Washington state's step toward a clean-energy future in the new year will involve more communities generating their own renewable energy. The Evergreen State is one of four chosen by the National Governors Association to swap policy advice on how to modernize its electric-powe

Researchers at a Washington state lab say the amount of sewage treated in the United States each year could yield 30 million barrels of oil. (Water Environment & Reuse Foundation)

RICHLAND, Wash. - Research at a Washington state lab is proving not everything flushed down the toilet is waste. Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have created an energy- and cost-effective method for turning sewage into biocrude oil. The process mirrors the geological conditions

Warmer winters in the Northwest due to climate change could mean more damage from species such as pine beetle. (Don Becker/U.S. Geological Survey)

SEATTLE – Many of the effects of climate change scientists did not expect to happen for decades into the future are happening now. According to a new study in the journal Science, researchers found that every ecosystem on Earth is being impacted by a warming globe, from the genetic level up.

BNSF is on trial over transport of coal on its railways in Washington state. (Matthew Nichols/Flickr)

SEATTLE - Environmental groups say railway company BNSF is allowing coal to fall off uncovered coal trains and into Washington's waterways, and this week they're looking to prove it in front of a federal judge in Seattle. The Puget Soundkeeper, Natural Resource Defense Council and others say BNSF i

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