Newscasts

PNS Weekend Newscast - March 25th, 2017 


Here's a look at the news we're covering:  A big blow to the GOP and President Trump when the plan to replace Obama Care fails,  A couple of new reports out on the state of water in the U.S show work needs to be done and budget cuts in one state are threatening those who are most vulnerable. 

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WV: Water

Comments from the public moved several Republican lawmakers in West Virginia to break with their party and vote against a controversial pollution bill. (W. Va. Legislature)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. -- House Bill 2506 - nicknamed the "Cancer Creek Bill" by its critics - passed the West Virginia House of Delegates last week, but not before a public outcry pushed several delegates to oppose it. The bill would permit more pollution in surface waters by changing how the state me

Utilities in southern coastal states are cleaning up the coal ash left from decades of power generation. (Sierra Club)

CHARLESTON, W.V. — As Congress debates the issue, utilities and communities in southeastern states are moving ahead with clean up of millions of tons of coal ash in impoundments at power plants. Until recently, Congress had been deadlocked regarding this legacy of a coal-powered century. In

Adam Swisher and Matt Kearns traveled the length of the Elk River. They say protecting it will be good for West Virginia's future. (Chad Cordell)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – As West Virginians consider their future, some say the Elk River runs right through it. In part to build support for the Birthplace of Rivers National Monument, Adam Swisher and Matt Kearns hiked, biked and paddled the entire Elk River in what they called the Elkspedition

The company behind a planned frack wastewater recycling plant says low-level radioactive waste that would come from it will be properly disposed of. (Sierra Club)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - The sludge that would come from an Antero frack wastewater recycling plant would be low-level radioactive material, but Antero says it will be properly disposed of. Some people in Doddrige County and the gas fields are worried about what will happen to the somewhat radioactive

In part because of drill cuttings such as these, once you take the salt and water out of fracking waste, the remaining sludge is hot enough to be considered low-level radioactive waste. (Bill Hughes)

CHARLESTON, W.Va - Recycling of fracking waste can reduce water use and pollution from the wells, but only by creating low-level nuclear waste too hot for landfills. One fracking-waste recycler is operating near Fairmont and another is planned for Doddridge County. They take the brine, mud and drill

West Virginians say news of lead contamination in the drinking water of Flint, Mich., is painfully familiar. (Friends of Water)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. - Nearly 40 West Virginia groups are sending an open letter to the people of Flint, Michigan saying they know what it's like to have contaminated drinking water. When the news leaked that Flint's water has high levels of lead, many folks in Charleston immediately thought of the

DEP samples taken downhill from one part of a waste disposal site in Ritchie County last fall suggest the injection well site is leaking frack waste. (WV DEP)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. - A disposal well site in Ritchie County is leaking frack waste, according to a West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection report. After complaints from residents, the DEP took samples from around a Hall Drilling waste-injection well near Ellenboro last fall. Wheeling

One important method of coal-ash disposal may leave West Virginia's waters vulnerable to heavy metal contamination. (Sierra Club, Appalachian Voices)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - A loophole for disposal of toxic coal ash is being widely misused across northern West Virginia, according to experts worried about heavy metals leaching into creeks and rivers. As the U.S. wrestles with how to dispose of decades worth of coal ash, Jim Kotcon, Energy Committee

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