Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - February 21, 2018 


While school shooting survivors demand stricter gun control measures some teachers are talking about their own walkout; Republicans vow to keep fighting the new district map in Pennsylvania; and from the West Coast - a health care group slams Trump's "Skinny" insurance plans.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WV: Children's Issues

Thousands of teachers and school employees faced a cold rain to rally for better pay and insurance outside the West Virginia Capitol on Saturday. (Dan Heyman)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — West Virginia teachers say they'll strike Thursday and Friday over pay and health insurance, and bills likely to pass the legislature look unlikely to prevent a longer walkout. The House and Senate have debated raising teacher pay by 1 percent a year. But according to the

The parents of children who get care through CHIP are watching Congress anxiously. (Pixabay)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – Without renewed funding from Congress, the West Virginia Children's Health Insurance Program is running on fumes - which is worrying families. At the end of next month, the program will stop new enrollment, a first step in winding down. That's scary for the parents of th

The Annie E. Casey Foundation has just issued an important study of children's well-being in West Virginia and around the country. (Pixabay)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. - A high proportion of West Virginia children are living in stubbornly persistent poverty, according to a major new study. The Annie E. Casey Foundation's "Race for Results" report looked at a variety of health, education, family stability and income data by state. In West Virgin

Medicaid supports much of the health-care provided in West Virginia schools. (Mary Kuhlman)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – Health care providers say a Republican bill that includes Medicaid cuts would threaten West Virginia's school health services. Medicaid pays much of the cost for school nurses and therapists here, and for more than 50 school-based community clinics, many in rural areas.

West Virginia lawmakers are considering imposing work requirements on people seeking federal food aid, but many of those people have barriers to employment. (West Virginia Center on Budget And Policy)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. -- Bills to put hurdles in the way of people seeking federal food aid are cruel and counterproductive, say advocates for the poor. Senate Bill 60 and companion House Bill 2132 would put asset tests and possibly work requirements on West Virginians seeking help from the Supplemen

New mother Sarah Starks says the Promise Scholarship kept her in the state and shouldn't be cut. (Dan Heyman)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – The children's advocacy group Our Children Our Future is releasing its annual legislative priority list. Some items focus on programs at risk in the state's budget crisis. Lawmakers are facing a shortfall of more than $500 billion for next year. And the West Virginia Ce

West Virginia is one of only a few states with rising levels of young people behind bars, and advocates say part of the issue is a lack of behavioral health care. (WV Virginia Center on Budget and Policy)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – Lack of behavioral health care for children may be undermining West Virginia's efforts to reduce truancy, cut juvenile incarceration and improve foster care, advocates say. They pointed to surveys showing that a much higher than average portion of state high school stude

African-American children under age 5 in West Virginia are twice as likely to live in poverty as their white peers, according to a new report.(WV KIDS COUNT)

CHARLESTON, W.V. — African-American children in West Virginia aren't faring well compared to their white peers, according to a new report from West Virginia Kids Count. But, the report’s authors said, many of the problems they found can be solved. The group's research confirmed dispari

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