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PNS Daily News - March 29, 2017 


Here’s a look at what’s making news today: Trump follows through on promises to dismantle climate policies; the head of the White House-Russia investigation says he won’t step down; and coast-to-coast opposition grows to Session’s sanctuary cities stance.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WV: Early Childhood Education

Medicaid is fifty years old, and research shows its positive effects on West Virginia children. Photo courtesy National Institutes of Health.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – Medicaid is 50 years old this week, and the impact it's had on the lives of children is being praised, both by advocates and academics. Renate Pore, director of health care policy for West Virginians for Affordable Healthcare, says 60 percent of the pregnancy care and birt

More than one in four West Virginia children lives in poverty, and a new Kids Count survey says their families have been passed up by the economic recovery. Photo courtesy Pennsylvania Partnerships for Children.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – West Virginia's children are faring worse, and the state's ranking on key measures of caring for them has fallen, according to the latest Annie E. Casey Foundation KIDS COUNT report. The annual survey found 27 percent of West Virginia children live below the federal povert

PHOTO: The state Legislature looks likely to restore threatened funding for children and family support programs, and maybe this time putting it in a more stable part of the budget. Photo of the state Capitol rotunda courtesy of the West Virginia Legislature.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Funding for state programs supporting children and families may be restored, and this time it may be permanent. While Governor Earl Ray Tomblin had proposed cuts of nearly $1 million for children and family programs for the second time in two years, lawmakers restored the money

PHOTO: Shyne Brown of Doddridge County says both of his daughters have used services provided by the state Family Resource Network. He says West Virginia should provide a steady funding stream for the programs. Photo by Dan Heyman.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - The agenda for the Our Children Our Future initiative in the upcoming West Virginia legislative session is heavy on prevention, in part because experts say prevention works in ensuring stable, long-term heath for children. Part of the West Virginia Healthy Kids and Families Coal

PHOTO: The Our Children, Our Future campaign says there has been mushrooming enthusiasm building towards next week's events aimed at easing West Virginia child poverty. Photo courtesy of the Our Children, Our Future campaign.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – Organizers stress next week's Our Children, Our Future campaign events at the state capitol will be much larger than last year's. They credit real public interest and a lot of grassroots organizing. Stephanie Tyree, director of community engagement and policy for The We

PHOTO: Sen. Bill Laird of Fayette County, a former county sheriff, says cutting programs that help West Virginia families in crisis will cost the state more money in the long run. Photo credit: Dan Heyman.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – Criminal justice officials are joining those who say West Virginia should restore $750,000 in cuts from programs for children and families. Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin cut the funding for programs, including child advocacy, in-home family education and support for victims of do

Lawmakers from both parties are joining efforts to get Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin to reconsider cuts to family and children programs. PHOTO of the Capitol rotunda copyrighted by the state Legislature.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – State lawmakers from both parties are asking Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin to let them consider restoring money cut from programs for children and families. The governor cut $1 million from safety-net budgets, including those for child advocacy, in-home family education and suppo

PHOTO: Advocates for early childhood and family support programs say WV state budget cuts could reduce their ability to bring in millions of dollars in matching money that is critical to their operations. They presented lawmakers with a symbolic check for the $13 million they leverage annually. Photo credit: Dan Heyman.

CHARLESTON, W. Va. - Advocates for early-childhood and family-support programs have delivered a symbolic $13 million check to West Virginia lawmakers - money they say could be lost if the state goes ahead with budget cuts. The state support for these programs allows them to leverage $13 million a y

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