PNS National Newscast

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the Public News Service (podcast)"
"Hey Google, play the Public News Service podcast"
"Alexa, play Public News Service podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

2020Talks

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Hey Google, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Alexa, play Two-Thousand-Twenty Talks podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - June 16, 2021 


A new report says the infrastructure package in Congress would boost the nation's economy and create millions of jobs; Democrats prepared to move ahead with or without GOP.


2021Talks - June 16, 2021 


Biden and Putin set to meet face-to-face; Schumer moves toward reconciliation for infrastructure; a Juneteenth national holiday in the works; and Republicans call for Fauci's ouster.

New UND Program to Focus on Health Issues for Indigenous People

Downloading Audio

Click to download

We love that you want to share our Audio! And it is helpful for us to know where it is going.
Media outlets that are interested in downloading content should go to www.newsservice.org
Click Here if you do not already have an account and need to sign up.
Please do it now, as the option to download our audio packages is ending soon

The University of North Dakota says dozens of potential applicants already are awaiting its new Ph.D  program that focuses on indigenous health issues. (Adobe Stock)
The University of North Dakota says dozens of potential applicants already are awaiting its new Ph.D program that focuses on indigenous health issues. (Adobe Stock)
 By Mike Moen - Producer, Contact
February 5, 2020

GRAND FORKS, N.D. -- The North Dakota Board of Higher Education has approved a new Ph.D program at the University of North Dakota, where students can focus on the health issues facing indigenous people.

The effort is being described as the first of its kind in the country. School officials say they hope to turn out more qualified scholars who have an interest in researching health disparities in indigenous communities. Donald Warne, associate dean for diversity, equity and inclusion at the university's School of Medicine and Health Sciences, said those disparities have common themes.

"There's a history of colonization and marginalization and other challenges that have led to higher exposure to certain social determinants of health," he said, "like poverty or poor educational systems."

In addition to researching and evaluating these disparities, Warne said graduates should be well suited to serve as effective health-care leaders in indigenous communities. Applications soon will be accepted for the courses, which will be available online.

Through the research, Warne said they also don't want to focus on the negative health issues for indigenous communities. He said evaluators also will be trained to figure out what's working.

"We need to know how effective it is," he said. "What is it improving? Can we measure it?"

For example, he said, some programs that focus on helping indigenous people rely less on government food assistance, with access instead to more traditional healthy foods their ancestors were able to consume. He said programs such as these need more evaluation so they can grow properly.

Best Practices