skip to main content
skip to newscasts

Tuesday, March 5, 2024

Public News Service Logo
facebook instagram linkedin reddit youtube twitter
view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

SCOTUS rules for Trump on ballot issue; CA high school students earn Google Career Certificates in high-demand fields; NY faith leaders help people address ecological grief; and a group offers abortion travel benefits for Mississippi women.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

The SCOTUS rules no state can remove a federal candidate from an election ballot saying that power rests with Congress, Super Tuesday primaries are today in sixteen states and a Colorado Court rules in the killing of Elijah McClain in police custody.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Hard times could be ahead for rural school districts that spent federal pandemic money on teacher salaries, a former Oregon lumber community drafts a climate-action plan and West Virginians may soon buy raw milk from squeaky-clean cows.

Utilities' Plans Called Out of Sync with Clean-Energy Transition Demands

play audio
Play

Tuesday, October 18, 2022   

Addition: Added spokesperson from PacifiCorp response 11/1/2022 at 10am MST.


Pacificorp delivers energy to 140,000 Wyoming households, but it received a "D" grade in a new report sounding the alarm over utility companies' actual commitments to transition to clean energy.

Holly Bender, senior director of energy campaigns for the Sierra Club, said despite public promises to reduce climate pollution by 2030, Pacificorp and other utilities are telling a very different story in obscure filings which can only be accessed by people with confidentiality agreements.

"What the utilities are saying through glossy reports to their customers and shareholders, that they are eager to transition to 100% clean energy, is radically different from what they tell their regulators," Bender said.

A PacifiCorp spokesperson responded to the report noting the utility forecasts having a 69 percent reduction in emissions from 2005 levels by 2030, exceeding national targets. Leading scientists have warned if utility companies do not quickly retire coal and gas power plants, people across the planet will face an increasingly dangerous future including disruptive migrations because of rising sea levels, prolonged drought, bigger and more destructive wildfires, flooding and even mass extinctions.

Noah Ver Beek, energy campaigns analyst for the Sierra Club, and the report's co-author, said under current plans, only 25% of existing coal and gas energy will be replaced by clean sources. Utilities are projected to add 133 gigawatts in wind and solar capacity, which can generate 308 million megawatt hours.

"Which is a significant addition of clean generation, but it is not nearly enough to replace all of the generating capacity that we have from fossil resources," Ver Beek said. "We need four times that to actually replace all these dirty, emitting resources with good, effective clean energy."

Leah Stokes, assistant professor of political science at the University of California-Santa Barbara, said current plans to build new gas power plants, and then shut them down in 10 years to meet climate goals, will leave customers on the hook with much higher utility bills. She added the costs of most power plants are usually spread out over 40 to 60 years.

"You're basically saying you're going to shove a lot of costs on ratepayers," Stokes said. "If you're going to build a gas plant and only operate it for a certain amount of time. That's the stranded-cost component."

Disclosure: The Sierra Club contributes to our fund for reporting on Climate Change/Air Quality, Energy Policy, Environment, and Environmental Justice. If you would like to help support news in the public interest, click here.


get more stories like this via email
more stories
A study by Wallethub ranked Kentucky 43rd in the nation for residents' dental health. (Adobe Stock)

Health and Wellness

play sound

A bill moving through the Kentucky Legislature would make fluoride treatment in drinking water optional for local municipalities. House Bill 141 …


Social Issues

play sound

Most teenagers eagerly anticipate turning 16 to start driving and 21 for other milestones, but the significance of obtaining the right to vote at 18 …

Social Issues

play sound

New York state lawmakers have appointed members to the Community Commission on Reparations Remedies, created through legislation Gov. Kathy Hochul …


A National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy report illustrated how some wealth was built through discriminatory practices including racially restrictive deed covenants. (Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

play sound

A new report argued many charitable foundations need to examine the origin of their wealth and repair harms done. The National Committee for …

Social Issues

play sound

A Wyoming nonprofit is helping single mothers climb out of poverty by connecting them with the training and support they need to step into and succeed…

Social Issues

play sound

Even though March is barely underway, parents of Wisconsin kids are being encouraged to plan for summer reading activities - especially if their …

Social Issues

play sound

A law aimed at immigrants crossing the border in Texas will not take effect tomorrow, after a federal judge halted enforcement until a court battle …

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021