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Uncovering America's methamphetamine history; PA Early Intervention programs vital for child development; measuring long-term impact of the O.J. Simpson trial on media literacy.

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President Biden's name could be left off the ballot in Alabama and Ohio, the Justice Dept. mandates background checks for gun show purchases, and Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds moves to allow state police to arrest undocumented migrants.

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Housing advocates fear rural low-income folks who live in aging USDA housing could be forced out, small towns are eligible for grants to enhance civic participation, and North Carolina's small and Black-owned farms are helped by new wind and solar revenues.

Iowa’s Governor Part of Historic Trend

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Thursday, December 1, 2022   

2022 was a banner year for women elected as governor. Nearly one-third of America's governors will be women next year, which is a record.

Iowa reelected a woman to the state's highest office for the first time in the state's history. And Republican Kim Reynolds is in good company, as there are now more female governors in the U.S. than ever before.

Karen Kedrowski, political science professor at Iowa State University, said electing a woman is not just symbolic. It also has a direct effect on getting things accomplished.

"Women are really motivated by wanting to fix something," Kedrowski explained. "We hear over and over again, 'I never envisioned that I would run for ...' fill in the blank. And then, they relate a story about something that happened that motivated them to run for office."

Despite the fact Iowa's highest political offices have been dominated by men, Kedrowski argued the results of the election prove Iowans do not discriminate against women in politics.

Kedrowski noted more women have spent the last three decades building their political resumes, entering such career fields as law, business and journalism. She added those professions considered most friendly to public service better prepare them for office than has been the case in the past.

"For a long time, there was this perception that women were 'weak' candidates and that voters would not vote for women," Kedrowski pointed out. "We know that is absolutely, positively not true. So, the challenge then becomes getting women who are qualified to build the political resume, so that they can be competitive."

Both people who were their party's nominees for governor of Iowa are women, but overall, Kedrowski said women remain underrepresented in executive positions.


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