skip to main content
skip to newscasts

Monday, June 17, 2024

Public News Service Logo
facebook instagram linkedin reddit youtube twitter
view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Family farmers call for tougher CAFO regulations in Farm Bill; The Midwest and Northeast brace for record high temperature in heatwave; Financial-justice advocates criticize crypto regulation bill; Ohio advocates: New rules strengthen protections for sexual-assault victims.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

The RNC kicks off its election integrity effort, Democrats sound a warning bell about conservatives' Project 2025, and Republicans suggest funding cuts to jurisdictions with legal cases against Trump.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

As summer nears, America's newest and largest international dark sky sanctuary beckons, rural job growth is up, but full recovery remains elusive, rural Americans living in prison towns support a transition, while birth control is more readily available in rural areas.

TX Fills Prison, Jail Job Vacancies with High School Recruits

play audio
Play

Friday, July 7, 2023   

Texas high schools offering training in corrections and law enforcement are being tapped by the state's Department of Criminal Justice to address massive staffing shortages at jails and prisons.

Nearly a third of corrections positions in Texas prisons are vacant.

Jordan Huebner, a criminal justice instructor at Huntsville High School in rural Walker County, home to seven state prisons and headquarters for the Texas Department of Criminal Justice, said at least 10% of her students will work in corrections at some point.

"Corrections is a big pathway that we're showcasing to them," Huebner emphasized. "Since that is something that they can go to as soon as they graduate from high school."

Texas is one of several states with no requirement to provide air conditioning for prisoners, leaving two-thirds of the 128,000 people serving time without relief. At least nine deaths were reported in prisons there during last month's heat wave.

According to the Vera Institute, Black people account for about 13% of state residents, but 27% of people in jail and 33% of people in prison.

Across the U.S., there are more than 3,500 high school law enforcement career programs.

Judah Schept, associate professor of justice studies at Eastern Kentucky University, said it is not an easy career path.

"People who work in prisons have higher rates of alcoholism, other forms of substance abuse and addiction, intimate partner violence, mental health problems, physical health problems," Schept outlined.

Thomas Washburn, executive director of the Law and Public Safety Education Network, said nonetheless, for many in rural America, it can be a lucrative job.

"Granted, working in a jail is not the best," Washburn acknowledged. "But when it's paying 40% better than anything else in your community, then it does make it a viable option."

Officer retention is a huge problem, according to the state's Department of Criminal Justice data. While the agency hires between 8,000 and 10,000 new people every year, the turnover rate is nearly 45%.

Original reporting by Anya Slepyan for The Daily Yonder in partnership with the Marshall Project, with support from the Education Writers Association Reporting Fellowship program.


get more stories like this via email

more stories
Since the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade in June 2022, 22 states have passed laws to protect or expand access to abortion.

Health and Wellness

play sound

Nebraska physicians and their patients have been dealing with the state's 12-week abortion ban since it went into effect just over a year ago…


Environment

play sound

West Virginia and other Appalachian states are littered with hundreds of "zombie mines," abandoned mines neither producing coal nor undergoing reclama…

Health and Wellness

play sound

Ohio advocates said the Biden administration's new Title IX regulations better protect victims of sexual assault, even as a group of states …


Environment

play sound

Wildlife advocates say the current transition to clean energy will not only protect people in New Mexico communities, but also will have a huge …

A 2015 study by the Boston Federal Reserve Bank found the median net worth for white households in Greater Boston was $250,000, while for Black households it was just $8. Researchers are currently updating those findings. (Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

play sound

A Legislature-backed Commission on Poverty in Massachusetts aims to address the state's historic wealth gap. The commission will study demographic …

Social Issues

play sound

Teaching artists can now apply for grant funding centered on programs for older Wyomingites. The Creative Aging Project Grant, from the Wyoming Arts …

Social Issues

play sound

A new report finds New York's rising cost of living and having living-wage jobs are priority issues for young voters. Research shows a single …

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021