skip to main content
skip to newscasts

Sunday, April 21, 2024

Public News Service Logo
facebook instagram linkedin reddit youtube twitter
view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Tribal advocates keep up legal pressure for fair political maps; 12-member jury sworn in for Trump's historic criminal trial; the importance of healthcare decision planning; and a debt dilemma: poll shows how many people wrestle with college costs.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Civil rights activists say a court ruling could end the right to protest in three southern states, a federal judge lets January 6th lawsuits proceed against former President Trump, and police arrest dozens at a Columbia University Gaza protest.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Wyoming needs more educators who can teach kids trade skills, a proposal to open 40-thousand acres of an Ohio forest to fracking has environmental advocates alarmed and rural communities lure bicyclists with state-of-the-art bike trail systems.

Alabama communities reflect on building resilience after tornado devastation

play audio
Play

Thursday, January 25, 2024   

It's been just over one year since tornadoes ravaged communities in areas such as Dallas, Coosa and Tallapoosa counties in Alabama.

While the new year brings hope, many residents are still grappling with the aftermath, raising important discussions about climate resilience and future recovery efforts.

Collins Pettaway III is a Selma resident and vice basileus of the Omega Chi Chapter of the Omega Psi Phi Fraternity.

He said during the aftermath of the storm, several local organizations worked together to pick up the pieces and reach residents who couldn't access other parts of the city.

"We made the decision to open up our fraternity house as a distribution center, and so we immediately started pulling in the funds that we had as a chapter to buy food," said Pettaway. "We set up dinner. Little did we realize that would turn into a much larger initiative."

Despite being located in "Dixie Alley," Pettaway said he believes the community was caught off guard, ill-prepared for the scale of devastation because the storm occurred in the off-season for tornadoes.

He acknowledged that preparedness and community action can play a crucial role in mitigating the effects of natural disasters, even during unexpected times.

Since the damage, community organizers within the community like the Rotary Club and Hometown Organizing Project have made efforts to rebuild and help residents focus on building climate resilience.

Pettaway said factors such as poverty rates and a lack of resources in the area are things that can make recovery from these events more difficult.

About one in three people among Selma's nearly 17,000 residents live in poverty.

However, he said he is hopeful that although the city may have a long way to go, this can serve as an opportunity to be better equipped in the future, but it's going to take community organizing and education.

"We're a year after, and we're just now getting ready to rebuild a good number of these homes, and that's just one step," said Pettaway. "You still have to also look at ensuring that these people who are already struggling economically and financially have the resources that they need. That's another step."

At the state level, Dallas County and other impacted areas were approved for disaster aid through FEMA.

The assistance includes grants for things such as temporary housing, home repairs and programs for business owners.




get more stories like this via email

more stories
In Pennsylvania, more than 400,000 people are living with Alzheimer's disease. (C. Nathaniel Brown)

Health and Wellness

play sound

Alzheimer's disease is the eighth-leading cause of death in Pennsylvania. A documentary on the topic debuts Saturday in Pittsburgh. "Remember Me: …


Social Issues

play sound

April is Financial Literacy Month, when the focus is on learning smart money habits but also how to protect yourself from fraud. One problem on the …

Environment

play sound

Arizona conservation groups and sportsmen alike say they're pleased the Bureau of Land Management will now recognize conservation as an integral part …


Social Issues

play sound

The need for child care and early learning is critical, especially in rural Arkansas. One nonprofit is working to fill those gaps by giving providers …

Workers harvest a field before the annual Skagit Valley Tulip Festival. (Jeff Huth/Adobe Stock)

Environment

play sound

An annual march for farmworkers' rights is being held Sunday in northwest Washington. This year, marchers are focusing on the conditions for local …

Social Issues

play sound

A new Gallup and Lumina Foundation poll unveils a concerning reality: Hoosiers may lack clarity about the true cost of higher education. The survey …

Environment

play sound

As state budget negotiations continue, groups fighting climate change are asking California lawmakers to cut subsidies for oil and gas companies …

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021