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VA law prevents utility shutoffs in extreme circumstances; MI construction industry responds to a high number of worker suicides; 500,000 still without power or water in the Houston area; KY experts: Children, and babies at higher risk for heat illness.

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Enticing remote workers to move is a new business strategy in rural America, Eastern Kentucky preservationists want to save the 20th century home of a trailblazing coal miner, and a rule change could help small meat and poultry growers and consumers.

Credit limit cuts signal financial woes for some Ohioans

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Friday, June 7, 2024   

In an analysis of 100 cities across the United States, Cincinnati ranks 22nd for decreasing credit limits - not for the city itself, but for its residents.

Large drops in the average credit limit can indicate where people are having financial problems. According to Cassandra Happe, an analyst at WalletHub, when credit card issuers evaluate the profitability and risks of particular users, they may drop someone's credit limit to reduce their own risk and increase long-term profitability.

Happe said people should be aware of how a credit limit decrease can affect their overall financial well-being.

"Adjust your spending accordingly," she said, "so you don't end up hurting your credit score in the long run by spending more, when you have less available to spend."

She noted that Cincinnati saw a sizable drop in the last year, with individual credit limits being cut an average of more than 15%. In the same survey, Columbus, Toledo and Cleveland were near the middle of the rankings at 45th, 72nd and 80th, respectively.

Happe said this indicates people there are handling their accounts well and the credit card issuers aren't seeing a need to dial back those limits.

It's a good idea," she said, "for people to check their current credit limits, and make sure their balances aren't causing what's known as their "credit utilization" to be higher than it otherwise would be.

"If you're seeing that your balance is substantially higher in comparison to your limit," she said, "you may want to focus on paying down that balance, to ensure that you're not going to incur a lot of credit score damage."

The report shows that for accounts opened in the first quarter of this year, Cincinnati ranked 77th in average credit limit per user, indicating higher credit limits for these new account holders, compared with many other cities in the study.

This story was produced in association with Media in the Public Interest and funded in part by the George Gund Foundation.


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