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Saturday, June 15, 2024

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The Supreme Court throws out a Trump-era ban on gun bump stocks; a look at how social media algorithms and Shakespearian villains have in common; and states receive federal funding to clean up legacy mine pollution.

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The Supreme Court for now protects access to abortion drug mifepristone, while Senate Republicans block a bill protecting access to in-vitro fertilization. Wisconsin's Supreme Court bans mobile voting sites, and colleges deal with funding cuts as legislatures target diversity programs.

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As summer nears, America's newest and largest international dark sky sanctuary beckons, rural job growth is up, but full recovery remains elusive, rural Americans living in prison towns support a transition, while birth control is more readily available in rural areas.

Virginia group hears stories from nationwide climate survivors

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Monday, June 10, 2024   

As summer storms begin, the Chesapeake Climate Action Network is speaking to people about how climate change affects them.

Worsening storms are causing billions of dollars in damage. Sea level rise in Virginia could leave residents in a similar position in the coming decades.

Jenny Sebold is a Vermont business owner whose shop was decimated when the Winooski River flooded in 2023. As a single mother, closing her shop for flood repairs put her in a tough financial position.

"One of them was launching off into the world and I had to often wake up in the morning and decide am I going to feed myself today or am I going to send my kid off to pursue his dream," Sebold recounted. "He's worked so hard for his whole young adult life, and so oftentimes I would have an empty belly."

Between 2020 and 2022, more than 3 million Americans became climate refugees since flooding forced them to move. In response to it and to other climate devastation, Vermont passed a law requiring fossil-fuel companies responsible for climate change to pay into a fund for the state to brace for worsening storms. The New York state Legislature recently passed a similar law.

Southwestern states are seeing the opposite: rising temperatures and extreme heat from climate change.

Patrice Parker is a student and cashier living in Arizona with several health conditions. She said the ever-worsening heat combined with such conditions disrupts her daily life.

"I have increased pain in my bones, joints and muscles, my migraines are worse," Parker outlined. "More often my fatigue and complete exhaustion, high heart rate, anxiety and depression are always worse when it's summer because of the heat."

She added the extreme heat agitates her asthma, making it harder to breathe. Studies show increasing temperatures from climate change promote more ground-level ozone pollution, which can trigger asthma attacks.


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Social Issues

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Members of the Nebraska Santee Sioux Tribe hope a solution to their five-year water ordeal may be on the way. Their tap water has been unusable for …


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Hurricane season is here, and conservationists are shining a light on the role salt marshes play in protecting coastal North Carolina communities…

Social Issues

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This weekend, Father's Day will be tough for children with a dad in jail or prison. More than 200,000 kids in Michigan have had an incarcerated …


While Wisconsin's Supreme Court blocked the use of mobile voting sites for absentee ballots, observers say they're not widely used compared with other types of alternative sites. (Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

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Local election administrators have new guidance from Wisconsin's highest court on alternative early voting sites. A political expert says the timing …

Environment

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When Minnesota farmers watch their crops grow this summer, some will monitor land that has better soil health. It's because of a fairly popular …

The Bipartisan Infrastructure Law allocated a total of $16 billion to address legacy pollution, including $11.3 billion in Abandoned Mind Land funding over 15 years. (Adobe Stock)

Environment

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West Virginia will receive $140 million to clean up legacy pollution in regions decimated by decades of coal mining. The money is part of $725 …

Environment

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Close to 200 events are planned now through Sunday at California state parks for the third annual State Parks Week. The events advance Gov. Gavin …

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The Supreme Court is expected to rule any day now on two cases that could allow judges to more easily overrule federal agencies, which could have big …

 

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