Sunday, January 16, 2022

Play

A new survey shows discrimination in medical settings affects quality of care; U.S. Supreme Court rejects vaccine and testing mandates for businesses; and New York moves toward electric school buses.

Play

U.S. House passes a new voting rights bill, setting up a Senate showdown; President Biden announces expanded COVID testing, and Jan. 6 Committee requests an interview with House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy.

Play

New website profiles missing and murdered Native Americans; more support for young, rural Minnesotans who've traded sex for food, shelter, drugs or alcohol; more communities step up to solve "period poverty;" and find your local gardener - Jan. 29 is National Seed Swap Day.

NH Sues Manufacturers Over PCB Pollution

Play

Wednesday, October 28, 2020   

CONCORD, N.H. -- Conservation groups are praising a New Hampshire lawsuit filed Tuesday that goes after the manufacturers of the toxic chemicals called polychlorinated biphenyls, commonly known as PCBs. The chemicals, which were banned in the 1970s, still are turning up in fish and other wildlife across the state.

New Hampshire Senior Assistant Attorney General Allen Brooks, chief of the state Department of Justice's Environmental Protection Bureau, said the state is suing Monsanto and two other companies now because new documents have surfaced that show money trumped their concern for the environment.

"Some of the internal memos will talk about the contamination of human food, killing of some marine species," he said, "but at the end of the day, similar internal memos will say, 'Well, but there's a lot of profit to be made.'"

Monsanto said in a statement that the company should not be held liable because it stopped producing PCBs 40 years ago and did not produce or dump them in New Hampshire. In the past few months, the company has spent more than $700 million to settle similar lawsuits. The New Hampshire suit says PCBs still foul about 80 square miles of ocean and 46 bodies of water in the state, including parts of the Souhegan River and Squam Lake, where the state has posted warnings against eating the fish.

Tiffany Grade, the Squam Lakes biologist for the Loon Preservation Committee, said PCBs bioaccumulate, which means animals and humans that ingest them can't clear them -- and they've been detected in failed nests across the state.

"Despite the fact PCBs have not been used for so long," she said, "they are still in the environment, still working through the food chain and still causing problems."

Catherine Corkery, director of the Sierra Club's New Hampshire chapter, said her organization wants the companies to take responsibility for the cleanup.

"The manufacturer has no solution of containment," she said. "That's the crime that's going on here; they know exactly what it does to human health and to the environment."

The state has said it is seeking the "financial resources necessary to remedy the harm that PCBs have caused to the environment."

The lawsuit is to be posted at courts.state.nh.us.


get more stories like this via email

Emissions from all buses, cars, and trucks make up 30% of New York City's carbon footprint. (Adobe Stock)

Environment

In her 2022 State of the State address, New York Gov. Kathy Hochul set new goals for electrifying the school bus fleets in the state. Clean-energy …


Social Issues

Finding and affording child care is no cakewalk for Oregon families right now. A new report details the pressures and some potential policy fixes…

Social Issues

Acknowledging the pandemic's toll on Kentucky students, teachers and families, Gov. Andy Beshear announced last night a state budget which would make …


Some dental providers in Minnesota's underserved communities say they have long waiting lists because of low reimbursement rates tied to public health programs. (Adobe Stock)

Health and Wellness

This month, Minnesota has raised state reimbursement rates for dentists who accept patients enrolled in the state's Medicaid program. Groups working …

Social Issues

Mobile carriers are starting to decommission their 3G cellular networks this year, some as soon as next month. Pennsylvania officials are reminding …

In the new survey, 38% of Black men surveyed in Ohio reported either being denied care or being provided inferior care in a medical setting. (Adobe Stock)

Health and Wellness

A new report suggests discrimination in medical settings affects the quality of care for many Ohioans. In a survey of more than 800 people, …

Environment

One hundred years ago today, the Izaak Walton League of America was founded in Chicago, with a mission of local stewardship of wild places, citizen …

Environment

An alliance of environmental groups and lawmakers has released an ambitious, wide-ranging set of goals for the 2022 Arizona Legislature. The …

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021