PNS National Newscast

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the Public News Service (podcast)"
"Hey Google, play the Public News Service podcast"
"Alexa, play Public News Service podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

2020Talks

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Hey Google, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Alexa, play Two-Thousand-Twenty Talks podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - June 11, 2021 


We reflect and update as HIV/AIDS first came to national attention 40 years ago this month; and when it comes to infrastructure spending, bipartisanship isn't dead yet.


2021Talks - June 11, 2021 


President Biden offers up more COVID-19 vaccines to the world; Dems and GOP close in on an infrastructure deal; and Speaker Pelosi tries to quell a spat over the Middle East among Democrats.

Report Questions Mountain Valley Pipeline's Financial Viability

Downloading Audio

Click to download

We love that you want to share our Audio! And it is helpful for us to know where it is going.
Media outlets that are interested in downloading content should go to www.newsservice.org
Click Here if you do not already have an account and need to sign up.
Please do it now, as the option to download our audio packages is ending soon

This feeder line in Monongalia County is part of the larger Mountain Valley Pipeline under construction to bring gas from West Virginia to Virginia. (Jim Kotcon)
This feeder line in Monongalia County is part of the larger Mountain Valley Pipeline under construction to bring gas from West Virginia to Virginia. (Jim Kotcon)
 By Suzanne Potter - Producer, Contact
March 16, 2021

CHARLESTON, W.Va. -- The proposed Mountain Valley Pipeline may not be needed because natural-gas demand in the Southeast is expected to decline over the next decade, according to a new report from the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA).

The $6 billion pipeline project, which still is under construction, would bring gas from northern West Virginia to southwestern Virginia.

Jim Kotcon, chair of the conservation committee for the West Virginia chapter of the Sierra Club, opposes the project, citing water and air pollution from natural-gas operations and the need to reduce reliance on fossil fuels in order to fight climate change.

"We should not be planning for increased capacity when investments in energy efficiency and renewable energy can supply our needs with much less environmental cost," Kotcon contended.

The owners of the pipeline say the project is needed to meet regional energy demands.

But the report found current capacity is sufficient and projects less demand from foreign markets than was originally forecast.

Kotcon pointed out the contracts for much of the gas come from companies affiliated with the owner of the pipeline, and he predicts big rate increases down the line to pay for it.

Cathy Kunkel, energy finance analyst for IEEFA and co-author of the report, said the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) has very rarely met a pipeline it didn't like.

"To my knowledge, they have only once denied a pipeline by saying it wasn't actually needed," Kunkel remarked. "Meanwhile the industry is overbuilding pipelines left and right."

President Biden recently appointed a new chairman of FERC, Richard Glick, who has said he intends to review the agency's policies on new natural-gas pipelines.

Meanwhile, both the Mountain Valley Pipeline and a proposed extension into North Carolina are tied up in ongoing litigation.

Disclosure: Sierra Club, West Virginia Chapter contributes to our fund for reporting on Climate Change/Air Quality, Endangered Species and Wildlife, Environment, and Public Lands/Wilderness. If you would like to help support news in the public interest, click here.
Best Practices