skip to main content
skip to newscasts

Tuesday, March 5, 2024

Public News Service Logo
facebook instagram linkedin reddit youtube twitter
view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

SCOTUS rules for Trump on ballot issue; CA high school students earn Google Career Certificates in high-demand fields; NY faith leaders help people address ecological grief; and a group offers abortion travel benefits for Mississippi women.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

The SCOTUS rules no state can remove a federal candidate from an election ballot saying that power rests with Congress, Super Tuesday primaries are today in sixteen states and a Colorado Court rules in the killing of Elijah McClain in police custody.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Hard times could be ahead for rural school districts that spent federal pandemic money on teacher salaries, a former Oregon lumber community drafts a climate-action plan and West Virginians may soon buy raw milk from squeaky-clean cows.

Could Curiosity Help Americans Bridge Deep Divides?

play audio
Play

Thursday, April 15, 2021   

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. - Polarization is seen as a growing problem in the United States, and many blame social media. But polls show Americans agree on many hot-button issues - and the divide may be more emotional than ideological.

One example is gun control. A majority of Americans polled agree that stricter laws should be enacted for firearms sales. And Rachel Kleinfeld of Santa Fe, a senior fellow with the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, said there's also some common ground on immigration and abortion. Kleinfeld said she believes polarization is less about ideas and more about emotions that cause people to identify with a "tribe" with similar beliefs. She suggested that curiosity could be the antidote.

"It is extremely hard to be curious and to hate at the same time," she said. "When you're curious, it doesn't mean you agree, but it does mean you have to find out more."

According to a recent Gallup poll, 57% of Americans favor tougher gun-control laws, while only 9% want to see fewer gun restrictions and 34% support the status quo.

Social scientists often recommend limiting internet and media consumption to avoid hot topics such as economics or politics - and when consuming news, trying to seek out balanced reporting. Kleinfeld said social-media users often gravitate to sites that reinforce their own beliefs, and young people can become polarized because they avoid anything they think might inflict trauma.

"Polarization, of course, is not just about young people," she said, "but there is something particular that does seem to be going on with young people about a lack of ability to handle too much complexity in their thinking."

While it might not be as extreme as sometimes portrayed, Kleinfeld said polarization is worrisome because what we're seeing in America now also has been observed in other countries with extreme violence.


get more stories like this via email
more stories
A study by Wallethub ranked Kentucky 43rd in the nation for residents' dental health. (Adobe Stock)

Health and Wellness

play sound

A bill moving through the Kentucky Legislature would make fluoride treatment in drinking water optional for local municipalities. House Bill 141 …


Social Issues

play sound

New York state lawmakers have appointed members to the Community Commission on Reparations Remedies, created through legislation Gov. Kathy Hochul …

Social Issues

play sound

A new report argued many charitable foundations need to examine the origin of their wealth and repair harms done. The National Committee for …


Massachusetts has been losing roughly 5,000 acres of forest each year to housing and industrial development as well as large-scale solar power installations, according to Mass Audubon. (Adobe Stock)

Environment

play sound

A proposed urban reforestation program in Massachusetts aims to help cities mitigate the effects of climate change. Legislation would create a state …

Social Issues

play sound

A Wyoming nonprofit is helping single mothers climb out of poverty by connecting them with the training and support they need to step into and succeed…

According to the Wisconsin Literacy organization, a child of parents with low literacy is 72% more likely to have low literacy themselves. (Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

play sound

Even though March is barely underway, parents of Wisconsin kids are being encouraged to plan for summer reading activities - especially if their …

Social Issues

play sound

A law aimed at immigrants crossing the border in Texas will not take effect tomorrow, after a federal judge halted enforcement until a court battle …

Environment

play sound

Minnesota already has a law calling for 100% carbon-free electricity by 2040. Now, there's a similar plan for transportation, and a legislative …

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021