skip to main content
skip to newscasts

Tuesday, March 5, 2024

Public News Service Logo
facebook instagram linkedin reddit youtube twitter
view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

SCOTUS rules for Trump on ballot issue; CA high school students earn Google Career Certificates in high-demand fields; NY faith leaders help people address ecological grief; and a group offers abortion travel benefits for Mississippi women.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

The SCOTUS rules no state can remove a federal candidate from an election ballot saying that power rests with Congress, Super Tuesday primaries are today in sixteen states and a Colorado Court rules in the killing of Elijah McClain in police custody.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Hard times could be ahead for rural school districts that spent federal pandemic money on teacher salaries, a former Oregon lumber community drafts a climate-action plan and West Virginians may soon buy raw milk from squeaky-clean cows.

Survey: Minnesotans Worried About Climate Change, but Hopeful on Solutions

play audio
Play

Thursday, November 17, 2022   

A major global conference centered around climate change is winding down this week. As those talks play out, Minnesotans are expressing their thoughts about the regional impact through a new survey.

The COP27 talks are being held in Egypt this year, and back in Minnesota, state residents say the issue is felt close to home.

In a survey released this fall by the University of Minnesota, 76% of residents said they're concerned about climate change.

Heidi Roop, director of the university's Climate Adaptation Partnership, said what is also telling is 62% of Generation Z respondents are hopeful society will do enough to reduce the most harmful impacts.

"We often hear about the doom and gloom of climate change, and there certainly is plenty to be concerned about," Roop emphasized. "But there is certainly a reason to have hope."

She noted part of the hope stems from other responses, in which Minnesotans largely feel solutions should be a shared responsibility of all levels of government, including municipal leaders.

Roop acknowledged on the global front, nations face scrutiny for insufficient follow-through on their pledges. But she pointed to positive movement at the state level to help counteract slow progress.

Roop cited legislative action over the past year, such as a "Solar for Schools" program, as well as community grants to develop climate plans. She argued it aligns with poll results indicating it should be an "all hands on deck" response.

"Where the rubber really meets the road is by us engaging, connecting and acting in climate-smart ways in our own communities," Roop contended.

Mike Reese, director of renewable energy for the University of Minnesota West Central Research and Outreach Center, said the state is also building solutions within agriculture. It includes the use of wind energy to power the production of nitrogen fertilizer.

"I would say we're responding in practical steps, and farmers in general are more conservative," Reese stressed. "But we always keep going back to 'the customer's always right' and they're going to require at some point these products need to have lower carbon intensities."

Among respondents, 60% said they would like to see more use of renewable energy to power homes and businesses, and Reese added the work they are doing certainly ties in with the sentiment.


get more stories like this via email
more stories
A study by Wallethub ranked Kentucky 43rd in the nation for residents' dental health. (Adobe Stock)

Health and Wellness

play sound

A bill moving through the Kentucky Legislature would make fluoride treatment in drinking water optional for local municipalities. House Bill 141 …


Social Issues

play sound

Most teenagers eagerly anticipate turning 16 to start driving and 21 for other milestones, but the significance of obtaining the right to vote at 18 …

Social Issues

play sound

New York state lawmakers have appointed members to the Community Commission on Reparations Remedies, created through legislation Gov. Kathy Hochul …


A National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy report illustrated how some wealth was built through discriminatory practices including racially restrictive deed covenants. (Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

play sound

A new report argued many charitable foundations need to examine the origin of their wealth and repair harms done. The National Committee for …

Social Issues

play sound

A Wyoming nonprofit is helping single mothers climb out of poverty by connecting them with the training and support they need to step into and succeed…

Social Issues

play sound

Even though March is barely underway, parents of Wisconsin kids are being encouraged to plan for summer reading activities - especially if their …

Social Issues

play sound

A law aimed at immigrants crossing the border in Texas will not take effect tomorrow, after a federal judge halted enforcement until a court battle …

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021