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FERC rule to spark energy transmission building nationwide; Rudy Giuliani pleads not guilty to felony charges in AZ election interference case; new digital tool emerges to help MN students with FAFSA woes; WY governor to talk property tax shifts in a TeleTown Hall.

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Israel's Prime Minister calls the new ICC charges unfair. Trump's lawyers found more classified documents in Mar-a-Lago, months after an FBI's search. And a new report finds election deniers are advancing to the fall election.

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Americans are buying up rubber ducks ahead of Memorial Day, Nebraskans who want residential solar have a new lifeline, seven community colleges are working to provide students with a better experience, and Mississippi's "Big Muddy" gets restoration help.

New rules to reduce methane emissions aim to fight climate change

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Monday, December 18, 2023   

Groups fighting climate change are praising the Environmental Protection Agency's new rules, which aim to reduce the amount of methane leaked into the atmosphere from oil and gas operations by 80%.

Oil and gas companies will have to inspect pipelines for leaks and phase out routine burning of methane, known as flaring, from new oil wells.

Janessa Goldbeck, a Marine veteran and CEO of the Vet Voice Foundation, said methane is an extremely potent greenhouse gas and reducing it is a matter of national security.

"When the world is destabilized by extreme weather and resource reduction, that creates a national security prerogative for us here at home," Goldbeck contended. "As a leader of a veterans organization, we think it's our moral imperative to step up and do everything we can to ensure that we're reducing emissions."

The rule also allows for the EPA to vet data from third-party groups monitoring the atmosphere for methane leaks and notify the companies responsible. The American Petroleum Institute, a trade group for the oil and gas industry, said it is still reviewing the rule but warned the industry must work to "balance emissions reductions with the need to continue meeting rising energy demand."

Goldbeck countered the Golden State is already suffering the effects of climate change.

"We're going to continue to see increasingly extreme weather, hot summers, increasingly hot fire seasons, more rainy, wet seasons, which cause mudslides and flooding," Goldbeck outlined. "Here in California, in particular, climate change is of huge concern."

The EPA estimated in 2030 alone, the expected reductions will be equivalent to the annual emissions from 28 million gasoline cars. California already has state-based limits on methane emissions, but the rule will standardize guidelines across the country. States now have two years to propose a methane reduction plan.


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