skip to main content
skip to newscasts

Friday, April 19, 2024

Public News Service Logo
facebook instagram linkedin reddit youtube twitter
view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Tribal advocates keep up legal pressure for fair political maps; 12-member jury sworn in for Trump's historic criminal trial; the importance of healthcare decision planning; and a debt dilemma: poll shows how many people wrestle with college costs.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Civil rights activists say a court ruling could end the right to protest in three southern states, a federal judge lets January 6th lawsuits proceed against former President Trump, and police arrest dozens at a Columbia University Gaza protest.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Rural Wyoming needs more vocational teachers to sustain its workforce pipeline, Ohio environmental advocates fear harm from a proposal to open 40-thousand forest acres to fracking and rural communities build bike trail systems to promote nature, boost the economy.

Experts Worried About NYC’s New Plan for Mentally Ill Homeless People

play audio
Play

Thursday, December 8, 2022   

New York City Mayor Eric Adams' new plan for aiding the mentally ill is facing backlash for its effectiveness.

Adams' plan allows police officers, firefighters, paramedics and other trained professionals to involuntarily hospitalize anyone deemed to be severely mentally ill. The new plan is aimed specifically at homeless people dealing with severe mental illness.

But, experts view the plan as shortsighted, and not as a more permanent solution.

Billye Jones is a licensed clinical social worker and an adjunct professor at New York University's Silver School of Social Work.

She said she feels the plan doesn't necessarily address long-term benefits of in-patient care, and adds that it also overlooks the issue of homelessness.

"Fundamentally, not having a home is destabilizing and it can diminish anyone's mental health and overall sense of safety," said Jones. "I don't really think that's being addressed in the plan."

Jones said there needs to be a long-term commitment to mental health systems, dealing with homelessness and stabilizing people long-term.

She said the plan would be better if it addressed the intersections of homelessness and mental illness.

For the plan to be salvaged, Jones said she feels a multi-year plan with city agencies involved with mental health and housing need to have a voice at the table.

Some experts are glad the conversation about this issue is being brought to the forefront of the city's consciousness.

Michael Capiello is former president of the National Association of Social Workers' New York chapter. He said there should be some different ways of starting a plan, and wants to see an assessment done of people this plan will involve.

"I do not think we have a clear assessment of the population who are, what is referred to as treatment refractory," said Capiello, "who are not the types of people who engage in traditional mental-health services."

He said he thinks the city should also consider the difficulty of engaging this sector of the population.

The assessment should examine how people got to this point. He questions if these are people who have long-standing disabilities, or would have been identified by New York State's offices of Disabilities or Mental Health.

In the end, Capiello said he wants to understand where the disconnect began.

The hope for this plan is to quell the recent rash of violent attacks plaguing New York City's mass transit system.

Kendall Atterbury is a social worker and an adjunct professor at NYU's Silver School of Social Work who said she feels the Adams administration is not asking the right questions to help severely mentally ill people.

She adds there are solutions to solve the problem of homelessness, but not exactly an ideal one.

"There is no ideal solution," said Atterbury. "We have a little bit of a Gordian knot here and there is no Alexander's sword; none of us has that. So, I think that's important to just sit with. There are a lot of things I would do differently. The first step is address homelessness through housing stock. If you want to end homelessness, you figure out a way for people to have homes."

She noted that housing isn't just a solution to homelessness but is a priority to begin the work of helping someone with their mental illness.

Atterbury said she thinks this could be a city policy, in spite of the costs.

Since the moral obligation has been up front with this plan, she said she wonders where it rests, at the beginning of the process, the end, or when it's convenient.




get more stories like this via email
more stories
The Bureau of Land Management's newly issued Public Lands Rule is designed to safeguard cultural resources such as New Mexico's Chaco Culture National Park. (Photo courtesy SallyPaez)

Environment

play sound

Balancing the needs of the many with those who have traditionally reaped benefits from public lands is behind a new rule issued Thursday by the Bureau…


Social Issues

play sound

April is Financial Literacy Month, when the focus is on learning smart money habits but also how to protect yourself from fraud. One problem on the …

Environment

play sound

Arizona conservation groups and sportsmen alike say they're pleased the Bureau of Land Management will now recognize conservation as an integral part …


Social Issues

play sound

The need for child care and early learning is critical, especially in rural Arkansas. One nonprofit is working to fill those gaps by giving providers …

Workers harvest a field before the annual Skagit Valley Tulip Festival. (Jeff Huth/Adobe Stock)

Environment

play sound

An annual march for farmworkers' rights is being held Sunday in northwest Washington. This year, marchers are focusing on the conditions for local …

Social Issues

play sound

A new Gallup and Lumina Foundation poll unveils a concerning reality: Hoosiers may lack clarity about the true cost of higher education. The survey …

Environment

play sound

As state budget negotiations continue, groups fighting climate change are asking California lawmakers to cut subsidies for oil and gas companies …

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021