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Trump case expected to head to the jury today; IN food banks concerned about draft Farm Bill; NH parents, educators urge veto of anti-LGBTQ+ bills; Study shows a precipitous drop in migratory fish populations, in US and worldwide.

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Actor Robert DeNiro joins Capitol Police officers to protest against Donald Trump at his New York hush money trial as both sides make closing arguments. And the Democratic Party moves to make sure President Biden will be on the ballot in Ohio.

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Smokey Bear thought only "you" could prevent forest fires, but decomposing mushrooms may also help, a Native American community in Oregon is achieving healthcare sovereignty, and Colorado farmers hope fast-maturing, drought-tolerant seeds will better handle climate change.

National report issues cautionary tale after ND pension overhaul

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Monday, February 5, 2024   

CLARIFICATION: North Dakota will be closing its main public pension plan next year. An earlier version of this story did not indicate that several sectors are exempt. (7:04 p.m. CST Feb. 7, 2024)

Starting in 2025, North Dakota will close its main public pension plan for new hires - who will instead be offered a 401k-style benefit.

National researchers say these decisions are likely to create more problems.

The Legislature last year approved switching to a "defined-contribution plan" for future public workers, amid concerns about the size of North Dakota's pension system shortfall.

The National Institute on Retirement Security is out with a new analysis of similar moves made by other states.

The organization's Executive Director - and co-author of the report - Dan Doonan said there's no guarantee of lasting improvements.

"I think a lot of people think of this as like a fresh start, like, 'Oh, what do we want to offer?'" said Doonan. "But the reality is the existing plan will be there for many decades and still have obligations to pay out current workers and retiree benefits."

The report says among the states analyzed, employer costs increased significantly after closing a pension plan.

Doonan pointed to Alaska, with higher turnover for those hired after its pension plans closed because they might feel undervalued.

That state is now debating whether to switch back. Lawmakers supporting North Dakota's move argued it was thoroughly vetted with long-term thinking. While the state is planning to close the main part of its pension plan, workers from several different sectors will not be impacted.

Meanwhile, Doonan and other skeptics said they worry North Dakota will go down the same path as other states in having to deal with unintended consequences.

He encouraged states to be creative in addressing an underfunded pension system without making a controversial switch.

"We see other places where the benefit designs are designed to share some risk with workers and retirees and that helps them keep costs stable but still offer that core benefit employees like," said Doonan, "that makes it common so that when you walk into a school, the first teacher you meet might have twenty years [of] experience."

Doonan added that states with higher employee turnover after a pension plan has closed are essentially paying to train public workers who might leave for another state.

It's unclear if North Dakota lawmakers will revisit the issue on a larger scale anytime soon. The next scheduled regular session is set for early 2025.




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